Now you can sign up for upcoming free educational webinars covering the newest applications and techniques related to protein gel chemistries, western detection, flow cytometry, fluorescence microscopy, immunoassays, mass spectrometry, high content imaging and much more.

You can also see what webinars are available on demand in our Protein and Cell Analysis virtual education portal on LabRoots.com.

Upcoming webinars

November 7, 2017: The power of multiplexing and applications of the QuantiGene Plex Assay in oncology research and diagnostics

Speaker

Godfrey Grech, PhD, Head, Laboratory of Molecular Pathology, Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, University of Malta

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Abstract

Cancer research services in pathology laboratories worldwide have been negatively impacted by a lack of fresh-frozen tissue samples, the degradation of DNA and RNA in archival tissue, and tumor heterogeneity. To get accurate and reproducible gene expression and amplification results using archival material, a more robust and accurate test adapted to current clinical research workflows is needed.

Thermo Fisher Scientific, the world leader in serving science, has developed a comprehensive portfolio of Invitrogen immunoassays based on Luminex xMAP (multianalyte profiling) technology, a high-throughput solution enabling simultaneous detection and quantitation of multiple proteins. This efficient technology has proven to be a valuable tool for the comprehensive study of biological systems.

For the quantification of RNA in archival material, the Invitrogen QuantiGene Plex Assay is offers a fast and efficient multiplex solution using branched DNA (bDNA) technology on Luminex technology–based magnetic beads. Institutions, as well as professors like Godfrey Grech, have partnered with Thermo Fisher Scientific to apply this method and have determined that in the future it may have a wide range of potential applications in the diagnosis of tumors and is adaptable to the current diagnostic research workflow.

Professor Grech will explain the main advantages of this method, including: (1) accurate, simultaneous detection of multiple targets simultaneously, enhancing accuracy and sensitivity while minimizing use of precious samples, (2) exclusion of subjectivity and ambiguous results originating from image-based measurements, and (3) elimination of requirements for highly specialized facilities and human resources.

This method has a wide range of potential future applications, including tumor classification with diagnostic potential and measurement of biomarkers in liquid biopsies, enabling better patient management and disease monitoring. Quantitative measurement of biomarkers in archival material is also useful in oncology research with access to libraries of clinically annotated material—allowing for the verification of potential biomarkers and their correlation with clinical research outcomes using retrospective studies.

In this webinar, we will cover the following topics:

  • The benefits of multiplexing and Luminex technologies
  • The use of QuantiGene Plex Assays to accurately measure RNA from archival tumor sections
  • How to achieve quantitative measurement of biomarkers in clinically annotated materials for retrospective studies
  • Q&A opportunities with the experts 

Join us for this scientist-to-scientist presentation to share and discuss how this powerful immunoassay platform can help you meet your research goals faster.


Recent webinars now available on demand

Addressing the antibody reproducibility crisis: A panel discussion with key scientific leaders (presented September 12, 2017)

Multiple speakers, including

Aled Edwards, PhD, CEO, Structural Genomics Consortium, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; International Working Group for Antibody Validation (IWGAV) member

Matt Baker, Director of Strategy and Partnering for Antibodies and Immunoassay, Biosciences Division, Thermo Fisher Scientific

Anita Bandrowski, PhD, Scientific Lead, Neuroscience Information Framework, Center for Research in Biological Systems, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California, USA; Founder and CEO of SciCrunc

Paul K. Wallace, PhD, Professor of Oncology, and Director, Flow and Image Cytometry Facility, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY, USA; Associate Professor of Pathology, State University of New York at Buffalo, NY, USA

John Rogers, PhD, Senior R&D Manager, Mass Spectrometry Reagents, Protein and Cell Analysis, Biosciences Division, Thermo Fisher Scientific

Christoph Hergersberg, PhD, Vice President of R&D for Protein and Cell Analysis, and Antibodies and Immunoassays, Biosciences Division, Thermo Fisher Scientific

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Abstract

Every year, millions of dollars are wasted on poorly characterized and performing antibodies. Key researchers in the antibody community have recently come together to address this antibody crisis and develop standards to ensure proper characterization and consistency for antibodies in the laboratory. Join us for a panel discussion with members of the research community and Thermo Fisher Scientific leaders, as they discuss the antibody reproducibility crisis and proposed testing standards for antibodies to ensure they’re binding to the intended targets.

Understanding cell reprogramming in treatment-resistant prostate cancer using organoids (presented August 30, 2017)

Speaker

Kristine M Wadosky, PhD, Research Affiliate, Postdoctoral, Roswell Park Cancer Institute

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Abstract

Recent studies show that cancer cells can resist treatment by changing into a different cell type. Many treatments for specific cancers, such as breast, prostate, or lung, target vital pathways active in healthy tissue. The reliance of cancer cells on these pathways suggest that they retain properties of healthy cells. A prominent example of targeted treatment is androgen deprivation therapy for advanced prostate cancer. This therapy limits the production and effectiveness of androgen hormones because prostate cancer cells depend on androgen hormones, just like their healthy counterparts. Prostate cancers that become resistant to multiple rounds of therapy often no longer express the target of therapy. These resistant or ‘reprogrammed’ tumor cells are more likely to express different cell lineage markers. These markers are expressed by neuroendocrine cells, a rare cell type in healthy and untreated cancerous prostate tissue. Once prostate cancer cells are reprogrammed, current therapies are ineffective and patients quickly succumb to their disease. Our laboratory studies reprogramming in prostate cancer cells with the aim of developing new drugs to treat these resistant patients. We use murine models and 3D organoid culture of murine and human tumors to understand how prostate cancer cells acquire the ability to reprogram and become resistant. Organoid culture is a valuable tool in our research because it allows the formation of structures that include multiple cell types. In the future, we will use organoids of aggressive prostate cancer in screens of drug candidates and assess drug effectiveness in weeks, rather than the months or years required for classic in vivo studies.


Innovative quantitative imaging techniques and their utility in advancing neurobiology research (presented July 20, 2017)

Speakers

Daniel Beahcam, PhD, Senior Staff Scientist, Discovery Biology, Thermo Fisher Scientific
Nicholas Radio, PhD, Manager, Cellular Imaging and Analysis, Thermo Fisher Scientific
Michael Derr, MS, Scientist, Cell Biology, Thermo Fisher Scientific

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Abstract

Part 1—Daniel Beacham: Case study showing how CyQUANT Direct Cell Proliferation and Fluo-4 calcium imaging assays were used to demonstrate that CultureOne Supplement improves the functional maturation of human neural stem cell derived neurons Introduction of next-gen HTS ion and voltage sensor imaging tools designed to help investigators phenotype and interrogate excitable cell types in discovery, basic sciences and safety pharmacology research

Part 2—Nicholas Radio & Michael Derr: Review of techniques used to evaluate neurite outgrowth using HCA within a model system of primary cultures of rodent cerebellar granular cells (CGC). As researchers refine neurite outgrowth quantitative analysis using HCA, an emerging question is how to quantify this biology in more complex models that more faithfully recapitulate in vivo environments. By improving the maturation of iPSC derived NSCs to neurons, CultureOne supplement produces neuronal culture characteristics that are ideally suited for high-content analysis. Here we demonstrate improved accuracy and simplification of HCA on neuronal cultures differentiated in the presence of CultureOne supplement. Parameters used for phenotypic analysis and characterization of neuronal cultures include neurite outgrowth, neuron count and percent, and progenitor cell quantitation.

Five steps for publication-quality fixed-cell imaging the first time (presented June 21, 2017)

Speaker

Jason Kilgore, Technical Application Scientist, Thermo Fisher Scientific

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Abstract

Choosing the right path to discovery can hasten your success, but the wrong path can lead to missteps that extend the journey at the expense of time, money, and frustration. With over 40 years dedicated to cell imaging research, we offer long-proven tools and protocols to help confidently create quality cell images the first time. In fact, Invitrogen imaging reagents are cited more frequently in published research than any others. Leverage our experience to enable your success and avoid costly missteps. Whether you’re new to cell imaging, or an experienced researcher wanting to confirm your knowledge, consider these five proven steps to help ensure that your cell images are publication-ready the first time. 


High content imaging and analysis for drug discovery: phenotypic assays, instrumentation and software (presented June 13, 2017)

Speaker

Nicholas Dolman, Ph.D., Senior Staff Scientist, Biosciences Division, Thermo Fisher Scientific

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Abstract

High content imaging and analysis offers a robust, high throughput analysis of large numbers of cells with the benefit of the spatial and temporal demarcation afforded by fluorescence microscopy. This seminar will provide an overview of high content imaging platforms, the fluorescent labels required to automate the segmentation of cells and their subcellular domains as well as newly developed fluorescent assays from Thermo Fisher Scientific with an emphasis on those that provide an indication of cell viability, mechanisms of cell death, proliferation as well as the plethora of reagents that can be used to indicate pre-lethal toxicity. Newly developed phenotypic assays, in particular those used to profile CRISPR-Cas9 edited cells will be discussed. Novel probes and labeling approaches to report internalization of ligands and therapeutic antibodies will also be presented with reference to high content imaging.


The new generation in immunoassays (presented June 6, 2017)

Speaker

David Bourdon, PhD, Senior R&D Manager and Immunoassay Strategy Lead, Biosciences Division, Thermo Fisher Scientific

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Abstract

Thermo Fisher Scientific, is unveiling an affordable new platform for the next generation of high-sensitivity, ready-to-use immunoassays. Featuring serum compatible, Applied BioSystems TaqMan–based proximity ligation assay (PLA) and Invitrogen SiteClick antibody labeling technologies, this new assay combines the analyte specificity of high affinity antibody-antigen binding with the signal detection and amplification of real-time PCR.

Thermo Fisher Scientific, is unveiling an affordable new platform for the next generation of high sensitivity, ready-to-use immunoassays. Featuring serum compatible, Applied BioSystems TaqMan based proximity ligation assay (PLA) and Invitrogen SiteClick antibody labeling technologies, this new assay combines the analyte specificity of high affinity antibody-antigen binding with the signal detection and amplification of real-time PCR. Not only does this assay technique allow measurement of low expressing proteins that we may not have otherwise been able to detect, but it also provides an easy method to verify gene expression at a protein level.

In this webinar, we will address the following items related to this new platform:

  • High sensitivity—detect low levels of proteins with greater sensitivity than with other traditional methods like ELISA
  • Small sample consumption—use 2–5 µL of sample (e.g., 2 µL vs. 150 µL for triplicate wells with other methods)
  • Fast, easy workflow—no wash steps, 2 hours from sample to answer
  • Broad dynamic range—≥5 log units minimizes sample dilutions needed to ensure falling within the range
  • No proprietary instrument to purchase—runs on any real-time PCR instrument
  • Includes intuitive, free cloud-enabled software—for robust data analysis and statistical groupwise comparison
  • Publishing—the importance of validation for publishing purposes
  • Q & A with the expert

What are the current advances in Flow Cytometry? (presented May 3, 2017)

Speaker

J. Paul Robinson, PhD, SVM Professor of Cytomics, Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University

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Abstract

A number of new instruments have appeared in recent times to accommodate different applications and highlight technology advances. This webinar will focus on advances in the Invitrogen Attune NxT Flow Cytometer and outline where the technology within the Attune NxT fits in current and future applications. I will discuss how the core acoustic focusing technology in the instrument was developed and how it has evolved.

A number of new instruments have appeared in recent times to accommodate different applications and highlight technology advances. This webinar will focus on advances in the Invitrogen Attune NxT Flow Cytometer and outline where the technology within the Attune NxT fits in current and future applications. I will discuss how the core acoustic focusing technology in the instrument was developed and how it has evolved.

Many flow cytometers have unique capabilities and the Attune NxT cytometer is no exception. For example, the combination of traditional hydrodynamic focusing in addition to acoustic focusing allows the Attune NxT cytometer to achieve some unique tasks such as very high sample flow rates with exceptional CVs. Everyone knows that flow cytometry offers extreme capability with single cell analysis, but we also know how difficult it is to run very small but valuable samples. A unique feature of the Attune NxT cytometer is that you can dilute that specimen by orders of magnitude and still run the sample in a reasonable time because the sample flow rate can be drastically increased without altering the quality of the data. This feature alone can be responsible for saving critical samples that normally may be lost. In this regard it is pertinent to understand how and why the Attune NxT fluidics is capable of operating under these conditions and I will explain the fundamentals of the how the high sample flow technology actually works. While discussing technology, I will also explain how the Attune NxT cytometer uses a special Coherent-designed laser-optics module delivery system to achieve a unique flattop (tophat) focused illumination spot that plays a significant role in the low CVs achieved under high sample flow. I will also discuss my experience with several other aspects of the core technology in the Attune NxT cytometer and show how its automated plate reader option can enhance unassisted throughput giving operators back valuable time.

Learning objectives:

  • Compare hydrodynamic and acoustic focusing in flow cytometry
  • List three applications where the Attune NxT provides a unique benefit
  • Describe three automated plate reader options for the Attune NxT

Antibody validation with immunoprecipitation/mass spectrometry and orthogonal methods

Speaker

John Rogers, PhD, Senior R&D Manager, Thermo Fisher Scientific

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Abstract

Antibodies are used in a broad range of research and diagnostic applications for the enrichment, detection, and quantitation of proteins and their modifications. Hundreds of thousands of antibodies are commercially available against thousands of proteins and their modifications. Unfortunately, many antibodies are poorly characterized, resulting in wasted time and cost as well as potentially flawed research conclusions. To verify the performance and specificity of Thermo Scientific antibodies, we have created a comprehensive workflow to assess antibody specificity using immunoprecipitation (immunocapture) combined with mass spectrometry (IP-MS). This strategy includes the selection of protein targets, antibody candidates, and cell models, as well as the characterization of cell models by LC-MS, IP-MS sample preparation and analysis, and bioinformatic analysis. In this webinar we will highlight new data demonstrating the power of this new workflow.


Super Bright antibody conjugates for flow cytometry—Bright polymer dyes for the violet laser

Speaker

Castle Funatake, PhD, Senior R&D Manager, Thermo Fisher Scientific

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Abstract

The Invitrogen eBioscience Super Bright polymer dyes represent a suite of bright fluorophores excited by the violet laser (405 nm). Optimized for use in flow cytometry, Super Bright antibody conjugates allow for expanded use of violet laser excitation and due to their inherent brightness, detection of cell populations with low abundance targets is possible. Data using the Super Bright conjugates will be presented in multicolor applications.


Chemiluminescent western blot detection: Bright and bold detection no matter how scarce your target

Speaker

Emily Halbrader, Product Manager, Thermo Fisher Scientific

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Abstract

Chemiluminescent detection is a widely-used method for detecting target proteins in a western blotting. This detection method is the result of an enzyme reaction of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) or alkaline phosphatase (AP) which produces light, and can be measured by use of x-ray film or a CCD imager. Chemiluminescent substrates allow for various advantages over other methods in detection including, but not limited to, increased sensitivity, high signal-to-noise ratios (or low background), and the ability to strip and reprobe the blot. Contrary to popular belief, however, “one size does not fit all” when it comes to western blotting substrates. With so many options on the market, it is sometimes difficult to determine which substrate performs the best for individual western blot systems. In this webinar we will discuss the best methods for optimizing this technique as well as how to determine the appropriate reagents for your sensitive target detection.