Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is well known for its role in glycolysis. GAPDH catalyzes the phosphorylation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate. In addition to this metabolic function, GAPDH is involved in many nonmetabolic cellular processes, including membrane fusion, transcription, RNA transport, DNA replication, and apoptosis.

GAPDH has been associated with various cancers and may also play a part in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s and Huntington’s diseases. While it is expressed differentially from tissue to tissue, GAPDH is often stably and constitutively expressed, making it useful as a loading control.

Quality Invitrogen GAPDH antibodies are available for a variety of research needs. We also offer fluorescent and enzyme-conjugated versions for your added convenience. 

Featured product data

Western blot analysis of GAPDH was performed by loading 75 µg of various cell lysates per well. The membrane was probed with a GAPDH monoclonal antibody conjugated to DyLight 680 dye (Cat. No. MA5-15738-D680).


Immunohistochemical analysis of GAPDH showing staining in the nucleus and cytoplasm of paraffin-embedded human kidney tissue (right), compared with a negative control without primary antibody (left). The cells were probed with a GAPDH monoclonal antibody (Cat. No. MA5-15738).


Immunofluorescence analysis of GAPDH (green) showing staining in the cytoplasm of HeLa cells (right), compared with a negative control without primary antibody (left). Cells were probed with a GAPDH loading control antibody (Cat. No. MA5-15738). Cells were washed with PBST and incubated with a secondary antibody conjugated to DyLight 488. F-actin was stained with phalloidin (red), and nuclei were stained with Hoechst™ stain (blue). 


Annotated product references

MA5-15738 was used in western blotting to characterize histone sprocket arginine residue mutants in yeast. Hodges AJ, Gallegos IJ, Laughery MF et al. (2015) Histone sprocket arginine residues are important for gene expression, DNA repair, and cell viability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genetics 200: 795–806.

39-8600 was used in western blotting to study the effect of loss of transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) on the proteome. Stalekar M, Yin X, Rebolj K et al. (2015) Proteomic analyses reveal that loss of TDP-43 affects RNA processing and intracellular transport. Neuroscience 293: 157–170.

PA1-987 was used in western blotting to study the regulation of the canonical Wnt pathway and its effect on cardiac progenitor development. Bisson JA, Mills B, Paul Helt JC et al. (2015) Wnt5a and Wnt11 inhibit the canonical Wnt pathway and promote cardiac progenitor development via the Caspase-dependent degradation of AKT. Dev Biol 398: 80–96.

MA5-15738 was used in western blotting to study the effects of tamoxifen administration on obesity. Liu L, Zou P, Zheng L et al. (2015) Tamoxifen reduces fat mass by boosting reactive oxygen species. Cell Death Dis 6: e1586.

MA5-15738 was used in western blot to test whether Notch signaling plays a role in rheumatoid arthritis. Park JS, Kim SH, Kim K et al. (2015) Inhibition of notch signalling ameliorates experimental inflammatory arthritis. Ann Rheum Dis 74: 267–274.


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