Upcoming Protein and Cell Analysis Educational Webinars

Now you can sign up for upcoming free educational webinars covering the newest applications and techniques related to protein gel chemistries, western detection, flow cytometry, fluorescence microscopy, immunoassays, mass spectrometry, high content imaging and much more.

Upcoming webinars

October 31, 2018, 08:00 a.m. PDT

Chromatin immunoprecipitation: Five steps to great results

Speaker

Eliza C. Small, PhD, Scientist III, Protein Biology, Antibodies and Immunoassays, Thermo Fisher Scientific

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Abstract

Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) is a technique researchers employ to obtain a snapshot of protein-DNA interactions in the cell. ChIP provides a picture of where your protein of interest is in the genome and understanding these interactions provides significant insight into gene expression. ChIP involves many steps and can be a challenging experiment. This webinar discusses the major steps in ChIP and provides many tips for a successful ChIP experiment, including things to consider before you start your ChIP experiment, methods for chromatin fragmentation, antibody selection, primer design and how to analyze your qPCR data. As ChIP often needs to be tailored for cell type and protein of interest, the presenter will share tips for optimization and troubleshooting at each step.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn how to design a successful ChIP experiment
  • Understand different methods for performing ChIP and how they can impact your experiment

November 7, 2018, 07:00 a.m. PDT and 08:00 p.m. PDT

Analysis of Surface Antigens on Exosomes

Speaker

Steve McClellan BS, MT, SCYM (ASCP)CM, Manager, Basic & Translational Research Operations, Chief, Flow Cytometry Core Laboratory, Mitchell Cancer Institute, University of South Alabama, United States

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Abstract

Exosomes have been shown to have significant roles in cancer including disease progression acting in the tumor micro-environment, metastasis acting in the peripheral circulation and immune suppression acting in both areas. We have sought to translate information gathered from exosomes isolated from cancer cell culture supernatant, to those isolated from pancreatic cancer plasma and cyst fluid obtained by endoscopy. Biomarker discovery is of the utmost importance for this deadly form of cancer. Traditional flow cytometers generally struggle to resolve individual exosomes. We have previously demonstrated that the use of ultra-filtered sheath fluid (0.025 um pore size) significantly increases the resolution of exosomes. We use the Invitrogen Attune NxT Flow Cytometer to analyze individual exosomes for the expression of a variety of surface markers using multi-color staining.

Learning Objectives:

  • Different exosome isolation methods
  • Best practices for the flow cytometric analysis of exosomes
  • Surface marker analysis of exosomes

On-demand webinars and events

Five steps for publication-quality immunohistochemistry imaging (presented May 2, 2018)

Speaker

Jason Kilgore, Technical Application Scientist, Thermo Fisher Scientific

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Abstract

Immunohistochemistry protocols, which utilize antibodies to visualize proteins in tissue sections, have many steps that need optimized to prevent non-specific background effects, artifacts, or inadequate detection by dyes.

This webinar will elucidate these steps and the careful precautions you need to take to help get specific labeling and publication-quality images to analyze your samples, draw conclusions, and ultimately publish your results, starting from the point of embedding your sample and running through blocking, antibody labeling, mounting, and imaging the sample. The presenter has first-hand experience developing and using many of these products and draws upon four decades of development of IHC products by Thermo Fisher Scientific.


Addressing the antibody reproducibility crisis: A panel discussion with key scientific leaders (presented September 12, 2017)

webinar

Multiple speakers, including

Aled Edwards, PhD, CEO, Structural Genomics Consortium, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; International Working Group for Antibody Validation (IWGAV) member

Matt Baker, Director of Strategy and Partnering for Antibodies and Immunoassay, Biosciences Division, Thermo Fisher Scientific

Anita Bandrowski, PhD, Scientific Lead, Neuroscience Information Framework, Center for Research in Biological Systems, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California, USA; Founder and CEO of SciCrunc

Paul K. Wallace, PhD, Professor of Oncology, and Director, Flow and Image Cytometry Facility, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY, USA; Associate Professor of Pathology, State University of New York at Buffalo, NY, USA

John Rogers, PhD, Senior R&D Manager, Mass Spectrometry Reagents, Protein and Cell Analysis, Biosciences Division, Thermo Fisher Scientific

Christoph Hergersberg, PhD, Vice President of R&D for Protein and Cell Analysis, and Antibodies and Immunoassays, Biosciences Division, Thermo Fisher Scientific

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Abstract

Every year, millions of dollars are wasted on poorly characterized and performing antibodies. Key researchers in the antibody community have recently come together to address this antibody crisis and develop standards to ensure proper characterization and consistency for antibodies in the laboratory. Join us for a panel discussion with members of the research community and Thermo Fisher Scientific leaders, as they discuss the antibody reproducibility crisis and proposed testing standards for antibodies to ensure they’re binding to the intended targets.


Antibody validation* with immunoprecipitation/mass spectrometry and orthogonal methods

John Rogers

Speaker

John Rogers, PhD, Senior R&D Manager, Thermo Fisher Scientific

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Abstract

Antibodies are used in a broad range of research and diagnostic applications for the enrichment, detection, and quantitation of proteins and their modifications. Hundreds of thousands of antibodies are commercially available against thousands of proteins and their modifications. Unfortunately, many antibodies are poorly characterized, resulting in wasted time and cost as well as potentially flawed research conclusions. To verify the performance and specificity of Thermo Scientific antibodies, we have created a comprehensive workflow to assess antibody specificity using immunoprecipitation (immunocapture) combined with mass spectrometry (IP-MS). This strategy includes the selection of protein targets, antibody candidates, and cell models, as well as the characterization of cell models by LC-MS, IP-MS sample preparation and analysis, and bioinformatic analysis. In this webinar we will highlight new data demonstrating the power of this new workflow.

*The use or any variation of the word “validation” refers only to research use antibodies that were subject to functional testing to confirm that the antibody can be used with the research techniques indicated. It does not ensure that the product(s) was validated for clinical or diagnostic uses.

Experimental Design Best Practice for Multicolor Flow Cytometry

Speaker

Carol Oxford, Field Applications Scientist, Thermo Fisher Scientific

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Abstract

Multicolor flow cytometry is a critical technique for many scientific endeavors, and a good experimental design is crucial for generating useful data. Being able to differentiate between the dyes and understanding the fluorochromes selection process is just the beginning: it’s vital to include the control controls, titrate each reagent, and to consider important concepts like spillover and spreading. In this webinar, we’ll discuss tips for ensuring a successful experiment and straightforward analysis.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the importance of titrating each reagent
  • Comprehend important concepts like spillover and spreading that aid in fluorochrome choice for multicolor design

Making polychromatic flow cytometry easy after instrument characterization and validation (presented July 12, 2018)

Speaker

Grace Chojnowski, Flow Cytometry and Imaging Facility Manager, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute

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Abstract

Polychromatic flow cytometry is a powerful tool in measuring and quantitating the expression of numerous antigens present on a single cell. Different instrument configurations or instruments with similar configurations can result in varied results with some populations not being easily resolved. In this presentation, I will present experiments we have performed at QIMR Berghofer to help characterize our instruments and how they respond to different fluorochromes commonly used in flow cytometry. Using this knowledge enables us to better design multicolour panels for our facility users as well as our external clients.

Learning objectives:

  • Learn to understand your flow cytometry instrument to determine individual instrument responses to different fluorochromes
  • Calculate a spillover spreading matrix to aid in fluorochrome choice for multi-color design
  • Better polychromatic panel design and fluorochrome choice for antigens of interest

Multiparameter cell cycle analysis (presented February 21, 2018)

Speaker

James W. Jacobberger, PhD, Professor Emeritus (Oncology), Director Cytometry & Microscopy Core, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Co-Director Immune Function Core, Case Center for AIDS Research

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Abstract

Most cell cycle assays amount to counting cells and/or measuring DNA content and deconvolving the resulting histogram into G1, S, G2+M, or G1, S, G2, and M. Considerable effort has been put to correlating DNA content with RNA, protein, or specific epitopes to determine or discover additional compartments. Here, we'll focus on flow cytometric analysis of DNA and specific epitopes. In recent efforts, using DNA peak to mark anaphase/cytokinetic populations in a 6 parameter analysis (DNA-area, DNA-peak, Light Scatter, cyclin A2, cyclin B1, and phospho-S10-histone H3), we identify 15 compartments with more than 4 additional compartments representing apoptotic cells.

Rational approaches to fixation and optimized staining protocols were worked out years ago. We have examined many experimental variations on the basic protocols without uncovering any major improvements that result in higher quality data. We are working currently on a “washless” staining assay, relying on a single high dilution to minimize background staining and relying on acoustic focusing to render the sample analyzable over a short period. The results are striking. The S/N is equivalent to a fully washed sample; the minimized handling results in better cell recovery, and improved recovery results in better definition of cell cycle compartments with low cell numbers. Additionally, the “washless” assay provides significant labor savings. For research use only. Not for use in diagnostic procedures.

Learning Objectives:

  • Overview of fixation & staining for intracellular epitopes
  • Underlying logic and purpose of cell cycle analysis
  • In depth, analytical protocol for multiparameter analysis backbone

The complex pharmacology of T cell CARs (presented December 12 and 13, 2017)

Speaker

Charles Prussak, PharmD, PhD. ,Director of the Cell Therapy Translational Laboratory (CTTL), University of California, San Diego (UCSD)

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Abstract

Recent research advances in the clinical development of immune modulating agents targeting PD-1, PDL-1 and CTLA-4 have renewed interest in the potential of cell based therapeutics including those that employ B-, T- and NK-lymphocytes and neutrophils. UCSD and its associated Moores Cancer Center have been at the forefront in the creation and development of these new therapeutic modalities, which are now being advanced into human clinical studies. The Cell Therapy Translational Laboratory (CTTL) under the direction of Dr. Charles Prussak, has been created by the UCSD School of Medicine to serve as the engine to generate translational cell based clinical studies that take advantage of breakthroughs discovered in UCSD research laboratories.

In his presentation, Dr. Prussak discusses the renewed interest in cell based immunotherapies and the advances his lab is making in creating these next generation therapies. Dr. Prussak is currently developing a chimeric antigen receptor modified T-cells (CARs) that target the fetal antigen ROR1. This ROR1 targeting T-cell CAR is currently in late stage pre-clinical development and phase I clinical studies are expected to be initiated in early 2018.

What you will learn:

  • Strategies in cell based immunotherapies and CAR generation 
  • Advances in the development of tumor targeting cell therapies 
  • How flow cytometry enables expanded tumor and variable testing 

Who should attend:

  • Cancer immunologists 
  • Researchers performing immuno-oncology research by flow cytometry 
  • Bench scientists and clinicians who have an interest in building their knowledge base around designing experiments or studies that leverage specific analytical advantages of flow cytometry

What are the current advances in Flow Cytometry? (presented May 3, 2017)

J. Paul Robinson

Speaker

J. Paul Robinson, PhD, SVM Professor of Cytomics, Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University

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Abstract

A number of new instruments have appeared in recent times to accommodate different applications and highlight technology advances. This webinar will focus on advances in the Invitrogen Attune NxT Flow Cytometer and outline where the technology within the Attune NxT fits in current and future applications. I will discuss how the core acoustic focusing technology in the instrument was developed and how it has evolved.

A number of new instruments have appeared in recent times to accommodate different applications and highlight technology advances. This webinar will focus on advances in the Invitrogen Attune NxT Flow Cytometer and outline where the technology within the Attune NxT fits in current and future applications. I will discuss how the core acoustic focusing technology in the instrument was developed and how it has evolved.

Many flow cytometers have unique capabilities and the Attune NxT cytometer is no exception. For example, the combination of traditional hydrodynamic focusing in addition to acoustic focusing allows the Attune NxT cytometer to achieve some unique tasks such as very high sample flow rates with exceptional CVs. Everyone knows that flow cytometry offers extreme capability with single cell analysis, but we also know how difficult it is to run very small but valuable samples. A unique feature of the Attune NxT cytometer is that you can dilute that specimen by orders of magnitude and still run the sample in a reasonable time because the sample flow rate can be drastically increased without altering the quality of the data. This feature alone can be responsible for saving critical samples that normally may be lost. In this regard it is pertinent to understand how and why the Attune NxT fluidics is capable of operating under these conditions and I will explain the fundamentals of the how the high sample flow technology actually works. While discussing technology, I will also explain how the Attune NxT cytometer uses a special Coherent-designed laser-optics module delivery system to achieve a unique flattop (tophat) focused illumination spot that plays a significant role in the low CVs achieved under high sample flow. I will also discuss my experience with several other aspects of the core technology in the Attune NxT cytometer and show how its automated plate reader option can enhance unassisted throughput giving operators back valuable time.

Learning objectives:

  • Compare hydrodynamic and acoustic focusing in flow cytometry
  • List three applications where the Attune NxT provides a unique benefit
  • Describe three automated plate reader options for the Attune NxT

Super Bright antibody conjugates for flow cytometry—Bright polymer dyes for the violet laser

Castle Funatake

Speaker

Castle Funatake, PhD, Senior R&D Manager, Thermo Fisher Scientific

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Abstract

The Invitrogen eBioscience Super Bright polymer dyes represent a suite of bright fluorophores excited by the violet laser (405 nm). Optimized for use in flow cytometry, Super Bright antibody conjugates allow for expanded use of violet laser excitation and due to their inherent brightness, detection of cell populations with low abundance targets is possible. Data using the Super Bright conjugates will be presented in multicolor applications.

3D cell cultures and tissue clearing: a high content confocal platform for the complete 3D characterization of advanced cell models (presented August 9, 2018)

Speaker

Dr. Michael Johnson, Chief Executive Officer, Visikol Inc.

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Abstract

With the advent of cost effective culturing approaches, 3D cell culture models (3D-CCMs) have been rapidly adopted for drug discovery since they provide a more physiologically relevant micro-environment; showing improved predictive utility for assessing drug efficacy and/or toxicity when compared to traditional 2D monolayer models. High content analysis/screening (HCA/HCS) also plays major role in drug screening, but one of the unique challenges of evaluating 3D-CCMs (i.e. spheroids, organoids, micro-tissues, organs-on-a-chip) is their opacity and thickness that limit optical imaging to only the outermost layers (~20-30 microns). Since the outermost cells are exposed to different physiological test conditions (oxygen, nutrients, media exchange, drug dosing), current image-based approaches induce a bias in the results since the outer layer of cells are found in a significantly different micro-environment than the interior. This shortcoming is particularly problematic when ascertaining the relative effectiveness of current therapeutic agents (e.g., immunoglobulin-based therapeutics, anti-proliferatives) since their effects are likely to be localized or concentrated to the surface while their efficacy within the interior are obfuscated and not fully resolved. Visikol has shown that through the addition of high content confocal microscopy with the Thermo Scientific CellInsight CX7 LZR High Content Analysis Platform and the Visikol® HISTO-M™ 3D Cell Culture Clearing Reagent that the entire population of cells within 3D-CCMs can be characterized.


High-content screening–based phenotypic analysis of organotypic 3D bronchial tissues (presented January 31, 2018)

Speaker

Diego Marescotti, PhD, High Content Screening Manager, System Toxicology, Philip Morris International R&D

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Abstract

One of the goals of the “3Rs principle” is to replace in vivo testing methodologies with in vitro procedures on human cells, followed by computational systems biology modelling to determine toxicological risk. System toxicology, which integrates standard toxicology together with quantitative analysis of large networks of molecular and functional changes, have demonstrated the potential to help realize the 3Rs vision. Omics and high-content screening methods represent fundamental pillars of a system toxicology-based approach and at Philip Morris International R&D we have developed a large battery of HCS assays to investigate how specific substances alter the phenotype of a cell grown in submerged conditions. As more physiological cell culture model, such as organotypic 3D culture are also part of our portfolio, we invested in the development of imaging-based approaches which would enable high-content investigations of 3D bronchial tissues. In this seminar, recently developed approach for phenotypic analysis of organotypic 3D bronchial tissues will be presented.


Innovative quantitative imaging techniques and their utility in advancing neurobiology research (presented July 20, 2017)

Speakers

Daniel Beacham, PhD, Senior Staff Scientist, Discovery Biology, Thermo Fisher Scientific
Nicholas Radio, PhD, Manager, Cellular Imaging and Analysis, Thermo Fisher Scientific
Michael Derr, MS, Scientist, Cell Biology, Thermo Fisher Scientific

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Abstract

Part 1—Daniel Beacham: Case study showing how CyQUANT Direct Cell Proliferation and Fluo-4 calcium imaging assays were used to demonstrate that CultureOne Supplement improves the functional maturation of human neural stem cell derived neurons Introduction of next-gen HTS ion and voltage sensor imaging tools designed to help investigators phenotype and interrogate excitable cell types in discovery, basic sciences and safety pharmacology research

Part 2—Nicholas Radio & Michael Derr: Review of techniques used to evaluate neurite outgrowth using HCA within a model system of primary cultures of rodent cerebellar granular cells (CGC). As researchers refine neurite outgrowth quantitative analysis using HCA, an emerging question is how to quantify this biology in more complex models that more faithfully recapitulate in vivo environments. By improving the maturation of iPSC derived NSCs to neurons, CultureOne supplement produces neuronal culture characteristics that are ideally suited for high-content analysis. Here we demonstrate improved accuracy and simplification of HCA on neuronal cultures differentiated in the presence of CultureOne supplement. Parameters used for phenotypic analysis and characterization of neuronal cultures include neurite outgrowth, neuron count and percent, and progenitor cell quantitation.


High content imaging and analysis for drug discovery: phenotypic assays, instrumentation and software (presented June 13, 2017)

Nicholas Dolman

Speaker

Nicholas Dolman, Ph.D., Senior Staff Scientist, Biosciences Division, Thermo Fisher Scientific

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Abstract

High content imaging and analysis offers a robust, high throughput analysis of large numbers of cells with the benefit of the spatial and temporal demarcation afforded by fluorescence microscopy. This seminar will provide an overview of high content imaging platforms, the fluorescent labels required to automate the segmentation of cells and their subcellular domains as well as newly developed fluorescent assays from Thermo Fisher Scientific with an emphasis on those that provide an indication of cell viability, mechanisms of cell death, proliferation as well as the plethora of reagents that can be used to indicate pre-lethal toxicity. Newly developed phenotypic assays, in particular those used to profile CRISPR-Cas9 edited cells will be discussed. Novel probes and labeling approaches to report internalization of ligands and therapeutic antibodies will also be presented with reference to high content imaging.

Versatile synthetic substrates for cellular assay development and 3D organoid culture and screening (presented June 5, 2018)

Speaker

Connie Lebakken, PhD, President and Chief Operating Officer, Stem Pharm, Incorporated

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Abstract

Stem Pharm Inc. has developed a synthetic hydrogel platform that allows the design and optimization of substrates for cell expansion, differentiation and screening applications including 3D cell culture and organoid models. Through control of the substrate mechanical properties and adhesion ligand presentation, and utilizing chemistries that maintain cellular health and function, Stem Pharm provides cell-specific biomaterials for advanced cellular assay platforms and specialized cell expansion and differentiation applications.

For many applications, these hydrogels provide advantages over animal-derived biomaterials such as the Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm mouse sarcoma-derived products marketed as Matrigel®, Geltrex® and Cultrex®. As one example, Stem Pharm has developed a vascular tubulogenesis hydrogel that enables high throughput screening (HTS) for vascular disruptors utilizing human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) or iPSC-derived endothelial cells.

Use of this hydrogel provides advantages over assay platforms that use Matrigel®, and similar products, that are challenging in an HTS workflow due to their temperature sensitivity and lot-to-lot variability. The Stem Pharm hydrogel platform is flexible for use in standard cell culture workflows, not requiring complex bioprinting methodologies and is suitable for co-culture and 3D organoid applications. Organoids can be formed and maintained in multi-well plates while adhering to the hydrogel rather than growing en masse in suspension cultures. This facilitates their use for toxicity or efficacy screening applications including those requiring imaging readouts. In another example, a neural organoid model enabled by these hydrogels has been developed which produced multicomponent neural constructs with 3D neuronal and glial organization, organized vascular networks, and microglia with ramified morphologies (Schwartz et al (2015), PNAS 112, 12516-12521 and Barry et al. (2017), Exp Biol Med 242, 1679-1689). This model was utilized in a developmental neurotoxicity screen and demonstrated to be very reproducible both well-to-well and between independent experiments.

This webinar will provide background on the rationale for use of synthetic hydrogels for advanced cellular applications in the drug discovery arena and will highlight techniques and technologies used to analyze outputs of these applications.


Simple and effective tools for antibody-drug conjugate screening and characterization (presented March 22, 2018)

Speaker

Chris Langsdorf, Staff Scientist, Thermo Fisher Scientific

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Abstract

Antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) represent a novel method to deliver a drug to diseased cell using the specific antigen-binding capability and internalization process. Antibodies that do not internalize efficiently will have sub-optimal therapeutic results. This webinar will introduce reactive chemistries, bright and versatile fluorophores, and powerful detection platforms. You will learn how these novel technologies can advance your ADC discovery and research.

Learn how to:

  • Use pH change to detect and measure internalization
  • Perform defined conjugation with the SiteClick Antibody Labeling system
  • Quickly and easily screen candidate antibodies for specific internalization

Understanding cell reprogramming in treatment-resistant prostate cancer using organoids (presented August 30, 2017)

Speaker

Kristine M Wadosky, PhD, Research Affiliate, Postdoctoral, Roswell Park Cancer Institute

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Abstract

Recent studies show that cancer cells can resist treatment by changing into a different cell type. Many treatments for specific cancers, such as breast, prostate, or lung, target vital pathways active in healthy tissue. The reliance of cancer cells on these pathways suggest that they retain properties of healthy cells. A prominent example of targeted treatment is androgen deprivation therapy for advanced prostate cancer. This therapy limits the production and effectiveness of androgen hormones because prostate cancer cells depend on androgen hormones, just like their healthy counterparts. Prostate cancers that become resistant to multiple rounds of therapy often no longer express the target of therapy. These resistant or ‘reprogrammed’ tumor cells are more likely to express different cell lineage markers. These markers are expressed by neuroendocrine cells, a rare cell type in healthy and untreated cancerous prostate tissue. Once prostate cancer cells are reprogrammed, current therapies are ineffective and patients quickly succumb to their disease. Our laboratory studies reprogramming in prostate cancer cells with the aim of developing new drugs to treat these resistant patients. We use murine models and 3D organoid culture of murine and human tumors to understand how prostate cancer cells acquire the ability to reprogram and become resistant. Organoid culture is a valuable tool in our research because it allows the formation of structures that include multiple cell types. In the future, we will use organoids of aggressive prostate cancer in screens of drug candidates and assess drug effectiveness in weeks, rather than the months or years required for classic in vivo studies.


Five steps for publication-quality fixed-cell imaging the first time (presented June 21, 2017)

Jason Kilgore

Speaker

Jason Kilgore, Technical Application Scientist, Thermo Fisher Scientific

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Abstract

Choosing the right path to discovery can hasten your success, but the wrong path can lead to missteps that extend the journey at the expense of time, money, and frustration. With over 40 years dedicated to cell imaging research, we offer long-proven tools and protocols to help confidently create quality cell images the first time. In fact, Invitrogen imaging reagents are cited more frequently in published research than any others. Leverage our experience to enable your success and avoid costly missteps. Whether you’re new to cell imaging, or an experienced researcher wanting to confirm your knowledge, consider these five proven steps to help ensure that your cell images are publication-ready the first time. 

The power of multiplexing and applications of the QuantiGene Plex Assay in oncology research and diagnostics (presented November 7, 2017)

Speaker

Godfrey Grech, PhD, Head, Laboratory of Molecular Pathology, Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, University of Malta

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Abstract

Cancer research services in pathology laboratories worldwide have been negatively impacted by a lack of fresh-frozen tissue samples, the degradation of DNA and RNA in archival tissue, and tumor heterogeneity. To get accurate and reproducible gene expression and amplification results using archival material, a more robust and accurate test adapted to current clinical research workflows is needed.

Thermo Fisher Scientific, the world leader in serving science, has developed a comprehensive portfolio of Invitrogen immunoassays based on Luminex xMAP (multianalyte profiling) technology, a high-throughput solution enabling simultaneous detection and quantitation of multiple proteins. This efficient technology has proven to be a valuable tool for the comprehensive study of biological systems.

For the quantification of RNA in archival material, the Invitrogen QuantiGene Plex Assay is offers a fast and efficient multiplex solution using branched DNA (bDNA) technology on Luminex technology–based magnetic beads. Institutions, as well as professors like Godfrey Grech, have partnered with Thermo Fisher Scientific to apply this method and have determined that in the future it may have a wide range of potential applications in the diagnosis of tumors and is adaptable to the current diagnostic research workflow.

Professor Grech will explain the main advantages of this method, including: (1) accurate, simultaneous detection of multiple targets simultaneously, enhancing accuracy and sensitivity while minimizing use of precious samples, (2) exclusion of subjectivity and ambiguous results originating from image-based measurements, and (3) elimination of requirements for highly specialized facilities and human resources.

This method has a wide range of potential future applications, including tumor classification with diagnostic potential and measurement of biomarkers in liquid biopsies, enabling better patient management and disease monitoring. Quantitative measurement of biomarkers in archival material is also useful in oncology research with access to libraries of clinically annotated material—allowing for the verification of potential biomarkers and their correlation with clinical research outcomes using retrospective studies.

In this webinar, we will cover the following topics:

  • The benefits of multiplexing and Luminex technologies
  • The use of QuantiGene Plex Assays to accurately measure RNA from archival tumor sections
  • How to achieve quantitative measurement of biomarkers in clinically annotated materials for retrospective studies
  • Q&A opportunities with the experts 

Join us for this scientist-to-scientist presentation to share and discuss how this powerful immunoassay platform can help you meet your research goals faster.


The new generation in immunoassays (presented June 6, 2017)

David Bourdon

Speaker

David Bourdon, PhD, Senior R&D Manager and Immunoassay Strategy Lead, Biosciences Division, Thermo Fisher Scientific

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Abstract

Thermo Fisher Scientific, is unveiling an affordable new platform for the next generation of high-sensitivity, ready-to-use immunoassays. Featuring serum compatible, Applied BioSystems TaqMan–based proximity ligation assay (PLA) and Invitrogen SiteClick antibody labeling technologies, this new assay combines the analyte specificity of high affinity antibody-antigen binding with the signal detection and amplification of real-time PCR.

Thermo Fisher Scientific, is unveiling an affordable new platform for the next generation of high sensitivity, ready-to-use immunoassays. Featuring serum compatible, Applied BioSystems TaqMan based proximity ligation assay (PLA) and Invitrogen SiteClick antibody labeling technologies, this new assay combines the analyte specificity of high affinity antibody-antigen binding with the signal detection and amplification of real-time PCR. Not only does this assay technique allow measurement of low expressing proteins that we may not have otherwise been able to detect, but it also provides an easy method to verify gene expression at a protein level.

In this webinar, we will address the following items related to this new platform:

  • High sensitivity—detect low levels of proteins with greater sensitivity than with other traditional methods like ELISA
  • Small sample consumption—use 2–5 µL of sample (e.g., 2 µL vs. 150 µL for triplicate wells with other methods)
  • Fast, easy workflow—no wash steps, 2 hours from sample to answer
  • Broad dynamic range—≥5 log units minimizes sample dilutions needed to ensure falling within the range
  • No proprietary instrument to purchase—runs on any real-time PCR instrument
  • Includes intuitive, free cloud-enabled software—for robust data analysis and statistical groupwise comparison
  • Publishing—the importance of validation for publishing purposes
  • Q & A with the expert

7 Steps of Protein Virtual Event (presented September 7, 2017)

The 7 Steps of Protein virtual event offers both broad and in-depth content, designed to give you the information and insights you need to empower your protein research every step of the way. Learn more and sign up for the on demand event.

Learn more


Chemiluminescent western blot detection: Bright and bold detection no matter how scarce your target

Emily Halbrader

Speaker

Emily Halbrader, Product Manager, Thermo Fisher Scientific

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Abstract

Chemiluminescent detection is a widely-used method for detecting target proteins in a western blotting. This detection method is the result of an enzyme reaction of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) or alkaline phosphatase (AP) which produces light, and can be measured by use of x-ray film or a CCD imager. Chemiluminescent substrates allow for various advantages over other methods in detection including, but not limited to, increased sensitivity, high signal-to-noise ratios (or low background), and the ability to strip and reprobe the blot. Contrary to popular belief, however, “one size does not fit all” when it comes to western blotting substrates. With so many options on the market, it is sometimes difficult to determine which substrate performs the best for individual western blot systems. In this webinar we will discuss the best methods for optimizing this technique as well as how to determine the appropriate reagents for your sensitive target detection.