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t208 Linden

Whole Allergen
Code t208
LOINC 11179-9
Family Tiliaceae
Source Material Pollen
Latin Name Tilia cordata
Other Names Basswood, European lime, Small-leaved European linden, Small leaved lime, Small-leaved linden
Categories Tree Pollens

Detection

IgE-mediated reactions

Linden pollen can cause asthma, allergic rhinitis and allergic conjunctivitis (1-3).

A study assessing the aeroallergen sensitisation in an allergic population in Portugal found that high pollen counts could explain the early sensitisation occurring, even in young children. Linden tree was found to be one of the most representative aeroallergens, resulting in sensitisation in 11.4 % of 557 paediatric (< or = 15 years old) patients. Other aeroallergens were grasses (44.9 %), D. pteronyssinus (32.5 %), D. farinae (29.1 %), Olea europea (27.5 %), Parietaria judaica (23.4 %), Cat dander (16.1 %), Artemisia vulgaris (17.6 %), Robinia pseudoacacia (12.2 %), Platanus acerifolia (11.4 %), moulds (11.2 %), Plantago lanceolata (10.6 %), Dog dander (10.4 %), and Pinus radiata (7.5 %) (4).

Sensitisation to the closely related T. platyphyllos has been reported among children with respiratory allergy in the Trakya region of Turkey (5).

Other reactions.

Occupational contact dermatitis with rhinoconjunctivitis due to T. cordata and colophonium exposure in a cosmetician has been reported (6). Contact urticaria has been reported (7).

Molecular Aspects

No allergens from this plant have yet been characterised.

Assessment of serum of a 21-year-old individual allergic to Linden tree demonstrated several protein bands, mainly at approximately 50 kDa, but also at approximately 23 and 10 kDa (1).

Cross Reactivity

Cross-reactivity among the different species of the genus could be expected (3).

Compiled By

Last reviewed: April 2022

References
 
  1. Mur P, Feo Brito F, Lombardero M, Barber D,Galindo PA, Gomez E, Borja J. Allergy to linden pollen (Tilia cordata).Allergy 2001;56(5):457-8
  2. Yman L. Botanical relations and immuno-logical cross-reactions in pollen allergy. 2nd ed. Pharmacia Diagnostics AB. Uppsala. Sweden. 1982: ISBN 91-970475-09
  3. Lewis WH, Vinay P, Zenger VE. Airborne and allergenic pollen of North America. John Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, USA. 1983;90-96:210
  4. Loureiro G, Rabaca M, Blanco B, Andrade S,Chieira C, Pereira C. Aeroallergens sensitization in an allergic paediatric population of Cova da Beira, Portugal. Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2005;33(4):192-8
  5. Yazicioglu M, Oner N, Celtik C, Okutan O, Pala O. Sensitization to common allergens, especially pollens, among children with respiratory allergy in the Trakya region of Turkey. Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2004;22(4):183-90
  6. Krakowiak A, Krêcisz B, Pas-Wyroślak A, Dudek W, Kieć-Swierzyñska M, Pałczyñski C.Occupational contact dermatitis with rhinoconjunctivitis due to Tilia cordata and colophonium exposure in a cosmetician. Contact Dermatitis 2004;51(1):34
  7. Picardo M, Rovina R, Cristaudo A,Cannistraci C, Santucci B. Contact urticaria from Tilia (lime).Contact Dermatitis 1988;19(1):72-3