Thermo Scientific™

Wellcolex™ E. coli O157

Catalog number: R30959501
Have Questions?
Thermo Scientific™

Wellcolex™ E. coli O157

Catalog number: R30959501
Have Questions?

Rapidly identify Escherichia coli O157 isolates on laboratory media using Thermo Scientific™ Remel™ Wellcolex™ E. coli O157 latex agglutination test. The inability of most E. coli O157:H7 to ferment sorbitol has been used to differentiate them in the laboratory. MacConkey agar containing sorbitol instead of lactose (SMAC) is often used as a primary screening medium1,2. Testing suspect colonies with Wellcolex* E. coli O157 determines whether the isolate belongs to the O157 serogroup.

 
Catalog Number
R30959501
Unit Size
Each
Quantity
50 Tests/Kit
Price (USD)
Full specifications
DescriptionWellcolex E. coli O157
Detectable AnalytesE. coli serogroup O157
TypeE. coli Testing Kit
Quantity50 Tests/Kit
Unit SizeEach
Showing 1 of 1
Catalog NumberSpecificationsUnit SizeQuantityPrice (USD)
R30959501Full specifications
Each50 Tests/KitRequest A Quote
DescriptionWellcolex E. coli O157
Detectable AnalytesE. coli serogroup O157
TypeE. coli Testing Kit
Quantity50 Tests/Kit
Unit SizeEach
Showing 1 of 1

Verocytotoxin-producing E. coli O157 are an important cause of diarrhoea, haemorrhagic colitis and haemolytic uraemic syndrome3,4. The pathogenicity of this organism is due to the expression of verocytotoxin (VT1 and/or VT2)5-7. Enteritis due to other serotypes is not unusual but in contrast to the majority of isolates, most E. coli O157:H7 do not ferment sorbitol and this has been used as a differential feature for laboratory identification. Testing suspect colonies with Wellcolex* E. coli O157 helps determine whether the isolate belongs to the O157 serogroup.

The Wellcolex* E. coli O157 Rapid Latex Test is categorised as highly complex under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Act (CLIA88 : Test System Code 40262; Analyte Code 1604).

  • Ready-to-use: Color coded latex and control reagents
  • Rapid: Results within 30 seconds.
  • Easy-to-interpret: Visible agglutination
  • Less sample required

The Wellcolex* E. coli O157 Test Reagent consists of a buffered suspension of red polystyrene latex particles coated with rabbit IgG antibodies specific for E. coli O157 and 0.05% Bronidox® as preservative. When a drop of the reagent is mixed on a card with a suspension of E. coli O157 organisms, rapid agglutination occurs through the interaction of specific IgG and O157 lipopolysaccharide antigen.

Some faecal coliforms can cause non-specific aggregation of latex particles, particularly when grown on sugar containing media such as MacConkey. Therefore a control latex is provided to assist with the identification of non-specific reactions. The control latex consists of a buffered suspension of red polystyrene latex particles coated with non-immune rabbit IgG and 0.05% Bronidox® as preservative.

The kit is also supplied with Positive and Negative controls. The positive control contains a dilute suspension of heat killed E. coli O157 antigens and 0.05% Bronidox® preservative. The negative control contains a dilute suspension of heat killed E. coli O106 antigens and 0.05% Bronidox® preservative.

Not all products are available for sale in all territories. Please inquire.

Remel™ and Oxoid™ products are now part of the Thermo Scientific brand.

  1. March, S.B. and Ratnam, S. (1986). Sorbitol-MacConkey medium for detection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 associated with hemorrhagic colitis. Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 23:869-872.
  2. Gray, L.D. (1995). Manual of Clinical Microbiology, 6th Ed., edited by Murray, P.R., Baron, E.J., Pfaller, M.A., Tenover, F.C and Yolken, R.H. American Society for Microbiology, Washington, D.C. Pages 450-456.
  3. Tarr, P.I. (1995). Escherichia coli O157:H7: Clinical, diagnostic and epidemiological aspects of human infection. Clinical Infectious Diseases, 20:1‑
  4. Wells, J.G., Davis, B.R., et al. (1983). Laboratory investigation of hemorrhagic colitis outbreaks associated with rare Escherichia coli serotype. Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 18:512-520.
  5. Ratnam, S., March, S.B., et al. (1988). Characterization of Escherichia coli serotype O157:H7. Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 26:2006-2012.
  6. Willshaw, G.A., Scotland, S.M., et al. (1992). Properties of Verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli of human origin of O serogroups other than O157. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 166:797‑
  7. Thielman, N.M. (1994). Enteric Escherichia coli infections. Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases, 7:582-591.

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