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EVOS™ 20X Objective, fluorite, LWD, phase-contrast, 0.45NA/6.12WD Invitrogen™

This fluorite objective is ideal for fluorescence and demanding transmitted-light applications. This is a long working distance (LWD) objective that is optimized for the imaging of slides, cell culture dishes and flasks, and microtiter plates. This is also a phase-contrast objective, making it useful for hard-to-see, translucent speciments. All EVOS objectives offer outstanding optical performance from visible light to near infrared light. The extensive choice of objectives satisfies needs across the spectrum of magnifications and optical specifications.

Additional characteristics of this EVOS objective:

• Magnification: 20X
• Numerical Aperture: 0.45
• Working Distance: 6.12 mm

Image quality
Microscope objectives may be the most important components of an optical microscope because they are responsible for primary image formation. Image quality is crucial to experimental success and a requirement for publication; EVOS objectives afford that quality across the visible spectrum to near infrared light. This performance results from years of lens manufacture perfection. EVOS objectives have the same or better numerical apertures as any other manufacturer's in the same class, and the broad selection means you have choices for your imaging requirements.

Objective classes

Achromat objectives are perfect for general applications, with standard correction of color and focus.

Fluorite objectives deliver excellent resolution and are made with higher numerical apertures than achromat objectives, resulting in brighter fluorescence signal and higher contrast imaging. The higher optical quality greatly reduces optical aberrations, and corrections for color and focus are at higher levels than achromat objectives. Fluorite objectives are ideally suited for fluorescence and demanding transmitted light applications, where the higher contrast make them ideally suited for color imaging.

Apochromat objectives are manufactured to the highest levels of resolution, fluorescence brightness, and contrast; chromatic aberrations are almost eliminated. They are recommended for the most demanding applications, particularly at magnifications of 60x and above. Apochromatic objectives are the best choice for the capture of color images in white light.

Brightfield contrast versus phase contrast objectives
Brightfield is the most basic form of light microscopy and is accomplished by sample absorption of light. A higher density area in a sample will absorb more light, thus increasing contrast in those areas.

Phase contrast objectives are most useful for hard to see, translucent specimens. This method of contrast is accomplished by converting phase shifts, caused by light passing through a translucent specimen, into brightness changes (i.e., contrast).

Long working distance versus coverslip-corrected objectives
Long working distance (LWD) objectives are optimized for use through vessels with a nominal wall thickness of 0.9-1.5 mm. This includes vessels commonly used in cell culture and cell-based assays, such as slides, cell culture dishes and flasks, microtiter well plates, etc. Coverslip-corrected objectives are optimized for use through #1.5 coverslips (thickness approximately 0.17 mm). These objectives have a higher magnification/NA ratio and provide higher resolution compared to LWD objectives.

For additional choices, visit the EVOS objectives selection guide
Explore the entire EVOS line of imaging systems and accessories

EVOS™ 4X Objective, fluorite, LWD, 0.13NA/10.58WD Invitrogen™

This fluorite objective is ideal for fluorescence and demanding transmitted-light applications. This is a long working distance (LWD) objective that is optimized for the imaging of slides, cell culture dishes and flasks, and microtiter plates. All EVOS objectives offer outstanding optical performance from visible light to near infrared light. The extensive choice of objectives satisfies needs across the spectrum of magnifications and optical specifications.

Additional characteristics of this EVOS objective:

• Magnification: 4X
• Numerical Aperture: 0.13
• Working Distance: 10.58 mm

Image quality
Microscope objectives may be the most important components of an optical microscope because they are responsible for primary image formation. Image quality is crucial to experimental success and a requirement for publication; EVOS objectives afford that quality across the visible spectrum to near infrared light. This performance results from years of lens manufacture perfection. EVOS objectives have the same or better numerical apertures as any other manufacturer's in the same class, and the broad selection means you have choices for your imaging requirements.

Objective classes

Achromat objectives are perfect for general applications, with standard correction of color and focus.

Fluorite objectives deliver excellent resolution and are made with higher numerical apertures than achromat objectives, resulting in brighter fluorescence signal and higher contrast imaging. The higher optical quality greatly reduces optical aberrations, and corrections for color and focus are at higher levels than achromat objectives. Fluorite objectives are ideally suited for fluorescence and demanding transmitted light applications, where the higher contrast make them ideally suited for color imaging.

Apochromat objectives are manufactured to the highest levels of resolution, fluorescence brightness, and contrast; chromatic aberrations are almost eliminated. They are recommended for the most demanding applications, particularly at magnifications of 60x and above. Apochromatic objectives are the best choice for the capture of color images in white light.

Brightfield contrast versus phase contrast objectives
Brightfield is the most basic form of light microscopy and is accomplished by sample absorption of light. A higher density area in a sample will absorb more light, thus increasing contrast in those areas.

Phase contrast objectives are most useful for hard to see, translucent specimens. This method of contrast is accomplished by converting phase shifts, caused by light passing through a translucent specimen, into brightness changes (i.e., contrast).

Long working distance versus coverslip-corrected objectives
Long working distance (LWD) objectives are optimized for use through vessels with a nominal wall thickness of 0.9-1.5 mm. This includes vessels commonly used in cell culture and cell-based assays, such as slides, cell culture dishes and flasks, microtiter well plates, etc. Coverslip-corrected objectives are optimized for use through #1.5 coverslips (thickness approximately 0.17 mm). These objectives have a higher magnification/NA ratio and provide higher resolution compared to LWD objectives.

For additional choices, visit the EVOS objectives selection guide
Explore the entire EVOS line of imaging systems and accessories

EVOS™ 40X Objective, fluorite, LWD, phase-contrast, 0.65NA/1.79WD Invitrogen™

This fluorite objective is ideal for fluorescence and demanding transmitted-light applications. This is a long working distance (LWD) objective that is optimized for the imaging of slides, cell culture dishes and flasks, and microtiter plates. This is also a phase-contrast objective, making it useful for hard-to-see, translucent speciments. All EVOS objectives offer outstanding optical performance from visible light to near infrared light. The extensive choice of objectives satisfies needs across the spectrum of magnifications and optical specifications.

Additional characteristics of this EVOS objective:

• Magnification: 40X
• Numerical Aperture: 0.65
• Working Distance: 1.79 mm

Image quality
Microscope objectives may be the most important components of an optical microscope because they are responsible for primary image formation. Image quality is crucial to experimental success and a requirement for publication; EVOS objectives afford that quality across the visible spectrum to near infrared light. This performance results from years of lens manufacture perfection. EVOS objectives have the same or better numerical apertures as any other manufacturer's in the same class, and the broad selection means you have choices for your imaging requirements.

Objective classes

Achromat objectives are perfect for general applications, with standard correction of color and focus.

Fluorite objectives deliver excellent resolution and are made with higher numerical apertures than achromat objectives, resulting in brighter fluorescence signal and higher contrast imaging. The higher optical quality greatly reduces optical aberrations, and corrections for color and focus are at higher levels than achromat objectives. Fluorite objectives are ideally suited for fluorescence and demanding transmitted light applications, where the higher contrast make them ideally suited for color imaging.

Apochromat objectives are manufactured to the highest levels of resolution, fluorescence brightness, and contrast; chromatic aberrations are almost eliminated. They are recommended for the most demanding applications, particularly at magnifications of 60x and above. Apochromatic objectives are the best choice for the capture of color images in white light.

Brightfield contrast versus phase contrast objectives
Brightfield is the most basic form of light microscopy and is accomplished by sample absorption of light. A higher density area in a sample will absorb more light, thus increasing contrast in those areas.

Phase contrast objectives are most useful for hard to see, translucent specimens. This method of contrast is accomplished by converting phase shifts, caused by light passing through a translucent specimen, into brightness changes (i.e., contrast).

Long working distance versus coverslip-corrected objectives
Long working distance (LWD) objectives are optimized for use through vessels with a nominal wall thickness of 0.9-1.5 mm. This includes vessels commonly used in cell culture and cell-based assays, such as slides, cell culture dishes and flasks, microtiter well plates, etc. Coverslip-corrected objectives are optimized for use through #1.5 coverslips (thickness approximately 0.17 mm). These objectives have a higher magnification/NA ratio and provide higher resolution compared to LWD objectives.

For additional choices, visit the EVOS objectives selection guide
Explore the entire EVOS line of imaging systems and accessories

EVOS™ 10X Objective, fluorite, LWD, 0.30NA/7.13WD Invitrogen™

This fluorite objective is ideal for fluorescence and demanding transmitted-light applications. This is a long working distance (LWD) objective that is optimized for the imaging of slides, cell culture dishes and flasks, and microtiter plates. All EVOS objectives offer outstanding optical performance from visible light to near infrared light. The extensive choice of objectives satisfies needs across the spectrum of magnifications and optical specifications.

Additional characteristics of this EVOS objective:

• Magnification: 10X
• Numerical Aperture: 0.30
• Working Distance: 7.13 mm

Image quality
Microscope objectives may be the most important components of an optical microscope because they are responsible for primary image formation. Image quality is crucial to experimental success and a requirement for publication; EVOS objectives afford that quality across the visible spectrum to near infrared light. This performance results from years of lens manufacture perfection. EVOS objectives have the same or better numerical apertures as any other manufacturer's in the same class, and the broad selection means you have choices for your imaging requirements.

Objective classes

Achromat objectives are perfect for general applications, with standard correction of color and focus.

Fluorite objectives deliver excellent resolution and are made with higher numerical apertures than achromat objectives, resulting in brighter fluorescence signal and higher contrast imaging. The higher optical quality greatly reduces optical aberrations, and corrections for color and focus are at higher levels than achromat objectives. Fluorite objectives are ideally suited for fluorescence and demanding transmitted light applications, where the higher contrast make them ideally suited for color imaging.

Apochromat objectives are manufactured to the highest levels of resolution, fluorescence brightness, and contrast; chromatic aberrations are almost eliminated. They are recommended for the most demanding applications, particularly at magnifications of 60x and above. Apochromatic objectives are the best choice for the capture of color images in white light.

Brightfield contrast versus phase contrast objectives
Brightfield is the most basic form of light microscopy and is accomplished by sample absorption of light. A higher density area in a sample will absorb more light, thus increasing contrast in those areas.

Phase contrast objectives are most useful for hard to see, translucent specimens. This method of contrast is accomplished by converting phase shifts, caused by light passing through a translucent specimen, into brightness changes (i.e., contrast).

Long working distance versus coverslip-corrected objectives
Long working distance (LWD) objectives are optimized for use through vessels with a nominal wall thickness of 0.9-1.5 mm. This includes vessels commonly used in cell culture and cell-based assays, such as slides, cell culture dishes and flasks, microtiter well plates, etc. Coverslip-corrected objectives are optimized for use through #1.5 coverslips (thickness approximately 0.17 mm). These objectives have a higher magnification/NA ratio and provide higher resolution compared to LWD objectives.

For additional choices, visit the EVOS objectives selection guide
Explore the entire EVOS line of imaging systems and accessories

Olympus™ 4X Objective, X-Apo, 0.16NA/13WD Thermo Scientific™

This 4X apochromat objective is from the new Olympus X line with exceptional optical performance. Through new manufacturing technology, the X-Apo objectives offer improved performance compared to standard Apo objectives in several critical areas: larger numerical aperture (NA), better image flatness, and a wider range of chromatic correction of 400–1,000 nm. These objectives deliver superb brightness and resolution across a large field of view for applications where the best possible image quality is desired. The Olympus objectives are compatible with all EVOS cell imaging systems. Our wide selection of EVOS and Olympus objectives satisfies needs across the spectrum of magnifications and optical specifications.

Additional characteristics of this Olympus objective:
• Magnification: 4X
• Numerical Aperture: 0.16
• Working Distance: 13 mm
• Superb image quality

Image quality
Microscope objectives may be the most important components of a microscope because they are responsible for primary image formation. High image quality is crucial to experimental success and often a requirement for publication; Olympus objectives afford that quality across the visible spectrum to near infrared light. This performance results from years of lens manufacture experience, and the broad selection of objectives means that you can choose the optimal objective for your imaging requirements.

Objective classes

Achromat objectives are perfect for general applications, with standard correction of color and focus.

Fluorite objectives deliver excellent resolution and are made with higher numerical apertures than achromat objectives, resulting in brighter fluorescence signal and higher contrast imaging. The higher optical quality greatly reduces optical aberrations, and corrections for color and focus are at higher levels than achromat objectives. Fluorite objectives are ideally suited for fluorescence and demanding transmitted light applications, where the higher contrast make them ideally suited for color imaging.

Apochromat objectives are manufactured to the highest levels of resolution, fluorescence brightness, and contrast; chromatic aberrations are almost eliminated. They are recommended for the most demanding applications, particularly at magnifications of 60x and above. Apochromatic objectives are the best choice for the capture of color images in white light.

Brightfield contrast versus phase contrast objectives
Brightfield is the most basic form of light microscopy and is accomplished by sample absorption of light. A higher density area in a sample will absorb more light, thus increasing contrast in those areas. Phase contrast objectives are most useful for hard to see, translucent specimens. This method of contrast is accomplished by converting phase shifts, caused by light passing through a translucent specimen, into brightness changes (i.e., contrast).

Long working distance versus coverslip-corrected objectives
Long working distance (LWD) objectives are optimized for use through vessels with a nominal wall thickness of 0.9-1.5 mm. This includes vessels commonly used in cell culture and cell-based assays, such as slides, cell culture dishes and flasks, microtiter well plates, etc. Coverslip-corrected objectives are optimized for use through #1.5 coverslips (thickness approximately 0.17 mm). These objectives have a higher magnification/NA ratio and provide higher resolution compared to LWD objectives.

For additional choices, visit the EVOS objectives selection guide.
Explore the entire EVOS line of imaging systems and accessories ›

Olympus™ 40X Oil Objective, X-Apo, 1.40NA/0.13WD Thermo Scientific™

This 40X apochromat objective is from the new Olympus X line with exceptional optical performance. Through new manufacturing technology, the X-Apo objectives offer improved performance compared to standard Apo objectives in several critical areas: larger numerical aperture (NA), better image flatness, and a wider range of chromatic correction of 400–1,000 nm. These objectives deliver superb brightness and resolution across a large field of view for applications where the best possible image quality is desired. The Olympus objectives are compatible with all EVOS cell imaging systems. Our wide selection of EVOS and Olympus objectives satisfies needs across the spectrum of magnifications and optical specifications.

Additional characteristics of this Olympus objective:
• Magnification: 40X
• Numerical Aperture: 1.40
• Working Distance: 0.13 mm
• Immersion: oil
• Superb image quality

Image quality
Microscope objectives may be the most important components of a microscope because they are responsible for primary image formation. High image quality is crucial to experimental success and often a requirement for publication; Olympus objectives afford that quality across the visible spectrum to near infrared light. This performance results from years of lens manufacture experience, and the broad selection of objectives means that you can choose the optimal objective for your imaging requirements.

Objective classes

Achromat objectives are perfect for general applications, with standard correction of color and focus.

Fluorite objectives deliver excellent resolution and are made with higher numerical apertures than achromat objectives, resulting in brighter fluorescence signal and higher contrast imaging. The higher optical quality greatly reduces optical aberrations, and corrections for color and focus are at higher levels than achromat objectives. Fluorite objectives are ideally suited for fluorescence and demanding transmitted light applications, where the higher contrast make them ideally suited for color imaging.

Apochromat objectives are manufactured to the highest levels of resolution, fluorescence brightness, and contrast; chromatic aberrations are almost eliminated. They are recommended for the most demanding applications, particularly at magnifications of 60x and above. Apochromatic objectives are the best choice for the capture of color images in white light.

Brightfield contrast versus phase contrast objectives
Brightfield is the most basic form of light microscopy and is accomplished by sample absorption of light. A higher density area in a sample will absorb more light, thus increasing contrast in those areas. Phase contrast objectives are most useful for hard to see, translucent specimens. This method of contrast is accomplished by converting phase shifts, caused by light passing through a translucent specimen, into brightness changes (i.e., contrast).

Long working distance versus coverslip-corrected objectives
Long working distance (LWD) objectives are optimized for use through vessels with a nominal wall thickness of 0.9-1.5 mm. This includes vessels commonly used in cell culture and cell-based assays, such as slides, cell culture dishes and flasks, microtiter well plates, etc. Coverslip-corrected objectives are optimized for use through #1.5 coverslips (thickness approximately 0.17 mm). These objectives have a higher magnification/NA ratio and provide higher resolution compared to LWD objectives.

For additional choices, visit the EVOS objectives selection guide.
Explore the entire EVOS line of imaging systems and accessories ›

EVOS™ Condenser Slider, Pinhole

Condenser sliders are used to improve illumination under certain conditions and several are available for the EVOS imaging systems, including a diffuser slider, pinhole slider, and meniscus sliders. Due to variances in sample size, color and thickness, actual slider use may differ from suggestions. This pinhole slider is intended for brightfield applications at all magnifications to enhance contrast. Note that the pinhole condenser slider is included with the EVOS FL and FL Color imaging systems.

Explore the entire EVOS line of imaging systems and accessories.

EVOS™ 20X Objective, fluorite, LWD, 0.45NA/6.23WD Invitrogen™

This fluorite objective is ideal for fluorescence and demanding transmitted-light applications. This is a long working distance (LWD) objective that is optimized for the imaging of slides, cell culture dishes and flasks, and microtiter plates. All EVOS objectives offer outstanding optical performance from visible light to near infrared light. The extensive choice of objectives satisfies needs across the spectrum of magnifications and optical specifications.

Additional characteristics of this EVOS objective:

• Magnification: 20X
• Numerical Aperture: 0.45
• Working Distance: 6.23 mm

Image quality
Microscope objectives may be the most important components of an optical microscope because they are responsible for primary image formation. Image quality is crucial to experimental success and a requirement for publication; EVOS objectives afford that quality across the visible spectrum to near infrared light. This performance results from years of lens manufacture perfection. EVOS objectives have the same or better numerical apertures as any other manufacturer's in the same class, and the broad selection means you have choices for your imaging requirements.

Objective classes

Achromat objectives are perfect for general applications, with standard correction of color and focus.

Fluorite objectives deliver excellent resolution and are made with higher numerical apertures than achromat objectives, resulting in brighter fluorescence signal and higher contrast imaging. The higher optical quality greatly reduces optical aberrations, and corrections for color and focus are at higher levels than achromat objectives. Fluorite objectives are ideally suited for fluorescence and demanding transmitted light applications, where the higher contrast make them ideally suited for color imaging.

Apochromat objectives are manufactured to the highest levels of resolution, fluorescence brightness, and contrast; chromatic aberrations are almost eliminated. They are recommended for the most demanding applications, particularly at magnifications of 60x and above. Apochromatic objectives are the best choice for the capture of color images in white light.

Brightfield contrast versus phase contrast objectives
Brightfield is the most basic form of light microscopy and is accomplished by sample absorption of light. A higher density area in a sample will absorb more light, thus increasing contrast in those areas.

Phase contrast objectives are most useful for hard to see, translucent specimens. This method of contrast is accomplished by converting phase shifts, caused by light passing through a translucent specimen, into brightness changes (i.e., contrast).

Long working distance versus coverslip-corrected objectives
Long working distance (LWD) objectives are optimized for use through vessels with a nominal wall thickness of 0.9-1.5 mm. This includes vessels commonly used in cell culture and cell-based assays, such as slides, cell culture dishes and flasks, microtiter well plates, etc. Coverslip-corrected objectives are optimized for use through #1.5 coverslips (thickness approximately 0.17 mm). These objectives have a higher magnification/NA ratio and provide higher resolution compared to LWD objectives.

For additional choices, visit the EVOS objectives selection guide
Explore the entire EVOS line of imaging systems and accessories

Olympus™ 10X Objective, X-Apo, 0.40NA/3.1WD Thermo Scientific™

This 10X apochromat objective is from the new Olympus X line with exceptional optical performance. Through new manufacturing technology, the X-Apo objectives offer improved performance compared to standard Apo objectives in several critical areas: larger numerical aperture (NA), better image flatness, and a wider range of chromatic correction of 400–1,000 nm. These objectives deliver superb brightness and resolution across a large field of view for applications where the best possible image quality is desired. The Olympus objectives are compatible with all EVOS cell imaging systems. Our wide selection of EVOS and Olympus objectives satisfies needs across the spectrum of magnifications and optical specifications.

Additional characteristics of this Olympus objective:
• Magnification: 10X
• Numerical Aperture: 0.4
• Working Distance: 3.1 mm
• Superb image quality

Image quality
Microscope objectives may be the most important components of a microscope because they are responsible for primary image formation. High image quality is crucial to experimental success and often a requirement for publication; Olympus objectives afford that quality across the visible spectrum to near infrared light. This performance results from years of lens manufacture experience, and the broad selection of objectives means that you can choose the optimal objective for your imaging requirements.

Objective classes

Achromat objectives are perfect for general applications, with standard correction of color and focus.

Fluorite objectives deliver excellent resolution and are made with higher numerical apertures than achromat objectives, resulting in brighter fluorescence signal and higher contrast imaging. The higher optical quality greatly reduces optical aberrations, and corrections for color and focus are at higher levels than achromat objectives. Fluorite objectives are ideally suited for fluorescence and demanding transmitted light applications, where the higher contrast make them ideally suited for color imaging.

Apochromat objectives are manufactured to the highest levels of resolution, fluorescence brightness, and contrast; chromatic aberrations are almost eliminated. They are recommended for the most demanding applications, particularly at magnifications of 60x and above. Apochromatic objectives are the best choice for the capture of color images in white light.

Brightfield contrast versus phase contrast objectives
Brightfield is the most basic form of light microscopy and is accomplished by sample absorption of light. A higher density area in a sample will absorb more light, thus increasing contrast in those areas. Phase contrast objectives are most useful for hard to see, translucent specimens. This method of contrast is accomplished by converting phase shifts, caused by light passing through a translucent specimen, into brightness changes (i.e., contrast).

Long working distance versus coverslip-corrected objectives
Long working distance (LWD) objectives are optimized for use through vessels with a nominal wall thickness of 0.9-1.5 mm. This includes vessels commonly used in cell culture and cell-based assays, such as slides, cell culture dishes and flasks, microtiter well plates, etc. Coverslip-corrected objectives are optimized for use through #1.5 coverslips (thickness approximately 0.17 mm). These objectives have a higher magnification/NA ratio and provide higher resolution compared to LWD objectives.

For additional choices, visit the EVOS objectives selection guide.
Explore the entire EVOS line of imaging systems and accessories ›

Olympus™ 40X Oil Objective, fluorite, coverslip-corrected

This fluorite objective is ideal for fluorescence and demanding transmitted-light applications.This is a coverslip-corrected objective that is optimized for imaging through #1.5 coverslips. All EVOS objectives offer outstanding optical performance from visible light to near infrared light. The extensive choice of objectives satisfies needs across the spectrum of magnifications and optical specifications.

Additional characteristics of this EVOS objective:

• Magnification: 40X
• Numerical Aperture: 1.30
• Working Distance: 0.2 mm
• Immersion: Oil

Image Quality
Microscope objectives may be the most important components of an optical microscope because they are responsible for primary image formation. Image quality is crucial to experimental success and a requirement for publication; EVOS objectives afford that quality across the visible spectrum to near infrared light. This performance results from years of lens manufacture perfection. EVOS objectives have the same or better numerical apertures as any other manufacturer's in the same class, and the broad selection means you have choices for your imaging requirements.

Objective Classes

Achromat objectives are perfect for general applications, with standard correction of color and focus.

Fluorite objectives deliver excellent resolution and are made with higher numerical apertures than achromat objectives, resulting in brighter fluorescence signal and higher contrast imaging. The higher optical quality greatly reduces optical aberrations, and corrections for color and focus are at higher levels than achromat objectives. Fluorite objectives are ideally suited for fluorescence and demanding transmitted light applications, where the higher contrast make them ideally suited for color imaging.

Apochromat objectives are manufactured to the highest levels of resolution, fluorescence brightness, and contrast; chromatic aberrations are almost eliminated. They are recommended for the most demanding applications, particularly at magnifications of 60x and above. Apochromatic objectives are the best choice for the capture of color images in white light.

Brightfield Contrast versus Phase Contrast Objectives
Brightfield is the most basic form of light microscopy and is accomplished by sample absorption of light. A higher density area in a sample will absorb more light, thus increasing contrast in those areas. Phase contrast objectives are most useful for hard to see, translucent specimens. This method of contrast is accomplished by converting phase shifts, caused by light passing through a translucent specimen, into brightness changes (i.e., contrast).

Long Working Distance versus Coverslip-Corrected Objectives
Long working distance (LWD) objectives are optimized for use through vessels with a nominal wall thickness of 0.9-1.5 mm. This includes vessels commonly used in cell culture and cell-based assays, such as slides, cell culture dishes and flasks, microtiter well plates, etc. Coverslip-corrected objectives are optimized for use through #1.5 coverslips (thickness approximately 0.17 mm). These objectives have a higher magnification/NA ratio and provide higher resolution compared to LWD objectives.

For additional choices, visit the EVOS Objectives selection guide
Explore the entire EVOS line of imaging systems and accessories

EVOS™ Condenser Slider, Meniscus B (semi-opaque liquids)

Condenser sliders are used to improve illumination under certain conditions and several are available for the EVOS imaging systems, including a diffuser slider, pinhole slider, and meniscus sliders. Due to variances in sample size, color and thickness, actual slider use may differ from suggestions. This Meniscus B slider is intended for brightfield applications at 2x magnification with high-volume samples in multi-well plates and with semi-opaque liquids.

Explore the entire EVOS line of imaging systems and accessories.

EVOS™ 40X Objective, fluorite, coverslip-corrected

This fluorite objective is ideal for fluorescence and demanding transmitted-light applications. This is a coverslip-corrected objective that is optimized for imaging through #1.5 coverslips. All EVOS objectives offer outstanding optical performance from visible light to near infrared light. The extensive choice of objectives satisfies needs across the spectrum of magnifications and optical specifications.

Additional characteristics of this EVOS objective:

• Magnification: 40X
• Numerical Aperture: 0.75
• Working Distance: 0.72 mm

Image Quality
Microscope objectives may be the most important components of an optical microscope because they are responsible for primary image formation. Image quality is crucial to experimental success and a requirement for publication; EVOS objectives afford that quality across the visible spectrum to near infrared light. This performance results from years of lens manufacture perfection. EVOS objectives have the same or better numerical apertures as any other manufacturer's in the same class, and the broad selection means you have choices for your imaging requirements.

Objective Classes

Achromat objectives are perfect for general applications, with standard correction of color and focus.

Fluorite objectives deliver excellent resolution and are made with higher numerical apertures than achromat objectives, resulting in brighter fluorescence signal and higher contrast imaging. The higher optical quality greatly reduces optical aberrations, and corrections for color and focus are at higher levels than achromat objectives. Fluorite objectives are ideally suited for fluorescence and demanding transmitted light applications, where the higher contrast make them ideally suited for color imaging.

Apochromat objectives are manufactured to the highest levels of resolution, fluorescence brightness, and contrast; chromatic aberrations are almost eliminated. They are recommended for the most demanding applications, particularly at magnifications of 60x and above. Apochromatic objectives are the best choice for the capture of color images in white light.

Brightfield Contrast versus Phase Contrast Objectives
Brightfield is the most basic form of light microscopy and is accomplished by sample absorption of light. A higher density area in a sample will absorb more light, thus increasing contrast in those areas.

Phase contrast objectives are most useful for hard to see, translucent specimens. This method of contrast is accomplished by converting phase shifts, caused by light passing through a translucent specimen, into brightness changes (i.e., contrast).

Long Working Distance versus Coverslip-Corrected Objectives
Long working distance (LWD) objectives are optimized for use through vessels with a nominal wall thickness of 0.9-1.5 mm. This includes vessels commonly used in cell culture and cell-based assays, such as slides, cell culture dishes and flasks, microtiter well plates, etc. Coverslip-corrected objectives are optimized for use through #1.5 coverslips (thickness approximately 0.17 mm). These objectives have a higher magnification/NA ratio and provide higher resolution compared to LWD objectives.

For additional choices, visit the EVOS Objectives selection guide
Explore the entire EVOS line of imaging systems and accessories

Olympus™ 60X Oil Objective, X-Apo, 1.42NA/0.15WD Thermo Scientific™

This 60X apochromat objective is from the new Olympus X line with exceptional optical performance. Through new manufacturing technology, the X-Apo objectives offer improved performance compared to standard Apo objectives in several critical areas: larger numerical aperture (NA), better image flatness, and a wider range of chromatic correction of 400–1,000 nm. These objectives deliver superb brightness and resolution across a large field of view for applications where the best possible image quality is desired. The Olympus objectives are compatible with all EVOS cell imaging systems. Our wide selection of EVOS and Olympus objectives satisfies needs across the spectrum of magnifications and optical specifications.

Additional characteristics of this Olympus objective:
• Magnification: 60X
• Numerical Aperture: 1.42
• Working Distance: 0.15 mm
• Immersion: oil
• Superb image quality

Image quality
Microscope objectives may be the most important components of a microscope because they are responsible for primary image formation. High image quality is crucial to experimental success and often a requirement for publication; Olympus objectives afford that quality across the visible spectrum to near infrared light. This performance results from years of lens manufacture experience, and the broad selection of objectives means that you can choose the optimal objective for your imaging requirements.

Objective classes

Achromat objectives are perfect for general applications, with standard correction of color and focus.

Fluorite objectives deliver excellent resolution and are made with higher numerical apertures than achromat objectives, resulting in brighter fluorescence signal and higher contrast imaging. The higher optical quality greatly reduces optical aberrations, and corrections for color and focus are at higher levels than achromat objectives. Fluorite objectives are ideally suited for fluorescence and demanding transmitted light applications, where the higher contrast make them ideally suited for color imaging.

Apochromat objectives are manufactured to the highest levels of resolution, fluorescence brightness, and contrast; chromatic aberrations are almost eliminated. They are recommended for the most demanding applications, particularly at magnifications of 60x and above. Apochromatic objectives are the best choice for the capture of color images in white light.

Brightfield contrast versus phase contrast objectives
Brightfield is the most basic form of light microscopy and is accomplished by sample absorption of light. A higher density area in a sample will absorb more light, thus increasing contrast in those areas. Phase contrast objectives are most useful for hard to see, translucent specimens. This method of contrast is accomplished by converting phase shifts, caused by light passing through a translucent specimen, into brightness changes (i.e., contrast).

Long working distance versus coverslip-corrected objectives
Long working distance (LWD) objectives are optimized for use through vessels with a nominal wall thickness of 0.9-1.5 mm. This includes vessels commonly used in cell culture and cell-based assays, such as slides, cell culture dishes and flasks, microtiter well plates, etc. Coverslip-corrected objectives are optimized for use through #1.5 coverslips (thickness approximately 0.17 mm). These objectives have a higher magnification/NA ratio and provide higher resolution compared to LWD objectives.

For additional choices, visit the EVOS objectives selection guide.
Explore the entire EVOS line of imaging systems and accessories ›

EVOS™ Condenser Slider, Blue

Condenser sliders are used to improve illumination under certain conditions and several are available for the EVOS imaging systems, including a diffuser slider, pinhole slider, and meniscus sliders. Due to variances in sample size, color and thickness, actual slider use may differ from suggestions. This blue slider is intended for brightfield applications at all magnifications as a daylight-correction filter for use with a color camera, like the one included with the EVOS FL Color Imaging System. The EVOS XL system enables direct adjustment of the white light LED color temperature.

Explore the entire EVOS line of imaging systems and accessories.

EVOS™ 40X Objective, fluorite, LWD, 0.65NA/1.79WD Invitrogen™

This fluorite objective is ideal for fluorescence and demanding transmitted-light applications. This is a long working distance (LWD) objective that is optimized for the imaging of slides, cell culture dishes and flasks, and microtiter plates. All EVOS objectives offer outstanding optical performance from visible light to near infrared light. The extensive choice of objectives satisfies needs across the spectrum of magnifications and optical specifications.

Additional characteristics of this EVOS objective:

• Magnification: 40X
• Numerical Aperture: 0.65
• Working Distance: 1.79 mm

Image quality
Microscope objectives may be the most important components of an optical microscope because they are responsible for primary image formation. Image quality is crucial to experimental success and a requirement for publication; EVOS objectives afford that quality across the visible spectrum to near infrared light. This performance results from years of lens manufacture perfection. EVOS objectives have the same or better numerical apertures as any other manufacturer's in the same class, and the broad selection means you have choices for your imaging requirements.

Objective classes

Achromat objectives are perfect for general applications, with standard correction of color and focus.

Fluorite objectives deliver excellent resolution and are made with higher numerical apertures than achromat objectives, resulting in brighter fluorescence signal and higher contrast imaging. The higher optical quality greatly reduces optical aberrations, and corrections for color and focus are at higher levels than achromat objectives. Fluorite objectives are ideally suited for fluorescence and demanding transmitted light applications, where the higher contrast make them ideally suited for color imaging.

Apochromat objectives are manufactured to the highest levels of resolution, fluorescence brightness, and contrast; chromatic aberrations are almost eliminated. They are recommended for the most demanding applications, particularly at magnifications of 60x and above. Apochromatic objectives are the best choice for the capture of color images in white light.

Brightfield contrast versus phase contrast objectives
Brightfield is the most basic form of light microscopy and is accomplished by sample absorption of light. A higher density area in a sample will absorb more light, thus increasing contrast in those areas.

Phase contrast objectives are most useful for hard to see, translucent specimens. This method of contrast is accomplished by converting phase shifts, caused by light passing through a translucent specimen, into brightness changes (i.e., contrast).

Long working distance versus coverslip-corrected objectives
Long working distance (LWD) objectives are optimized for use through vessels with a nominal wall thickness of 0.9-1.5 mm. This includes vessels commonly used in cell culture and cell-based assays, such as slides, cell culture dishes and flasks, microtiter well plates, etc. Coverslip-corrected objectives are optimized for use through #1.5 coverslips (thickness approximately 0.17 mm). These objectives have a higher magnification/NA ratio and provide higher resolution compared to LWD objectives.

For additional choices, visit the EVOS objectives selection guide
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