Product FAQ

What are the apparent molecular weights of the proteins in the Invitrogen Sharp Prestained Protein Standard in the different gel types?

Answer

The Invitrogen Sharp Prestained Protein Standard is suitable for NuPAGE Bis-Tris, Tris-Glycine and Tricine gels. This standard has not been tested on NuPAGE Tris-Acetate gels. The dyes that are covalently bound to the proteins in the Invitrogen Sharp Prestained Protein Standard were selected to minimize any effect they may have on migration of the ladder in different gel chemistries. As a result, the apparent molecular weights of the proteins are the same in NuPAGE Bis-Tris, Tris-Glycine and Tricine gels. Please see figure on this webpage (http://www.thermofisher.com/order/catalog/product/LC5800?ICID=search-product) showing the apparent molecular weight of each band. Note that the 3.5 kDa band is visible only on NuPAGE Bis-Tris gels run using MES SDS Running buffer or Tricine gels.

Answer Id: E11673

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Product FAQ

What are the storage conditions and shelf life for the HiMark Prestained Protein Standard?

Answer

We recommend storing the HiMark Prestained Protein Standard at -20 degrees C. The ladder is stable for 4 months when properly stored.

Answer Id: E11667

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Product FAQ

I am planning to run a NuPAGE Tris-Acetate gel to resolve a 150 kDa protein. Which of your prestained protein standards should I use?

Answer

We recommend using the HiMark Prestained Protein Standard, Cat. No. LC5699 for determination of apparent molecular weight of high molecular weight proteins on NuPAGE Tris-Acetate gels with Tris-Acetate SDS buffer system. For accurate estimation of molecular weight of high molecular weight proteins on NuPAGE Tris-Acetate gels with Tris-Acetate SDS buffer system, we recommend using the HiMark Unstained Protein Standard, Cat. No. LC5688.

Answer Id: E11668

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Product FAQ

What are the origins of the proteins in the Invitrogen Sharp Prestained Protein Standard?

Answer

The proteins in the Invitrogen Sharp Prestained Protein Standard are synthetic fusion proteins and their origins are proprietary. The 10, 20, 60 and 80 kDa proteins in the Invitrogen Sharp Prestained Standard have C-terminal 6xHis tags and hence are shown to cross react with the anti-His C-term antibody.

Answer Id: E11671

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Product FAQ

What are the storage conditions and shelf life for the Invitrogen Sharp Prestained Protein Standard?

Answer

We recommend storing the Invitrogen Sharp Prestained Protein Standard at -20 degrees C. It is stable for 12 months when properly stored.

Answer Id: E11670

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Product FAQ

Can I use the HiMark Prestained Protein Standard with NuPAGE Bis-Tris gels and Tris-Glycine gels?

Answer

The HiMark Prestained Protein Standard can be used with NuPAGE Invitrogen 4-12% Bis-Tris Gels (with NuPAGE MOPS SDS Running Buffer) and Invitrogen 4% Tris-Glycine Gel (with Tris-Glycine SDS Running buffer). However, to obtain the best results with high molecular weight proteins, we recommend using the HiMark Prestained Protein Standard with NuPAGE Invitrogen Tris-Acetate Gels (with Tris-Acetate SDS buffer system).

Answer Id: E11669

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Product FAQ

Why does my prestained standard give different molecular weights for different types of gels?

Answer

Protein gels vary in pH. Each of the proteins in the standard has a dye molecule attached to it, and the charge on these dye molecules can change depending on the pH of the gel. This change in charge will affect the migration of the protein on the gel.

Answer Id: E5431

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Product FAQ

Why do Thermo Scientific prestained protein ladders not show the real protein sizes?

Answer

Coupling of chromophores to proteins affects the apparent molecular weight of proteins in SDS-PAGE relative to unstained standards. The apparent molecular weight of prestained protein standards is calibrated in the classical TRIS glycine-SDS Laemmli system, however prestained proteins may have different mobility in other electrophoresis buffer and gel systems. It should also be noted that the sizing of proteins by gel electrophoresis does not give an exact value and depends on the protein sequence and post-modification.

Answer Id: E8803

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Product FAQ

I have been using the MultiMark Multi-Colored Standard and it has been discontinued. Is there an alternative product?

Answer

Yes, we recommend the Invitrogen Sharp Prestained Protein Standard (Cat. No. LC5800). It consists of 12 prestained protein bands in the range of 3.5 kDa to 260 kDa. Each band is stained in a distinct color for easy identification, and the bands are extremely tight and sharp for the most accurate molecular weight estimation. The marker is ready-to-use under denaturing and reducing conditions and can be used on NuPAGE Bis-Tris, Tris-Glycine, and Tricine gels.

Answer Id: E11657

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Citations & References

MagicMark and SeeBlue Protein Standards can be run together in the same lane by following a few simple guidelines

  • Authors: Allen Bautista, Barbara Kempf, James Frazier
  • Journal: Focus (2002) 24:8-10
Catalog #

Product Literature

Protein sample prep for MS

Citations & References

The typically mitochondrial DNA-encoded ATP6 subunit of the F1F0-ATPase is encoded by a nuclear gene in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

  • Authors: Funes Soledad; Davidson Edgar; Claros M Gonzalo; van Lis Robert; Pérez-Martínez Xochitl; Vázquez-Acevedo Miriam; King Michael P; González-Halphen Diego;
  • Journal: J Biol Chem (2002) 277:6051-6059
  • PubMed ID: 11744727
Catalog #

Product Literature

Technical handbook: Protein gel electrophoresis

Product Literature

Application Note: Fluorescent western blotting - an introduction for new users