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Novel signal amplification technology with applications in DNA and protein detection systems. Citations & References

  • Authors: Lisle CM, Bortolin S, Benight AS, Janeczko RA, Zastawny RL
  • Journal: Biotechniques
  • PubMed ID: 11414217
Catalog # A21251

Oligo(dA-dT)-dependent signal amplification for the detection of proteins in cells. Citations & References

  • Authors: Hanaki K, Ohka S, Yamamoto K, Nomoto A, Yoshikura H
  • Journal: Biotechniques
  • PubMed ID: 15152606
Catalog #

Peptide arrays with designed secondary structures for protein characterization using fluorescent fingerprint patterns. Citations & References

  • Authors: Usui K, Ojima T, Takahashi M, Nokihara K, Mihara H
  • Journal: Biopolymers
  • PubMed ID: 15054893
Catalog #

What is the difference between western blotting and far-western blotting? Product FAQ

Answer

The far-western blotting technique is quite similar to western blotting as it is based on a protein-protein interaction between a prey protein or target and an interacting protein. In a western blot, an antibody is used to detect the corresponding antigen on a membrane; in a far-western blot, the detection is done using any non-antibody protein. In a classical far-western analysis, a labeled or antibody-detectable “bait” protein is used to probe and detect the target “prey” protein on the membrane. The sample (usually a lysate) containing the unknown prey protein is separated by SDS-PAGE (sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) or native PAGE and then transferred to a membrane. When attached to the surface of the membrane, the prey protein becomes accessible to probing. After transfer, the membrane is blocked and then probed with a known bait protein, which usually is applied in pure form. Following reaction of the bait protein with the prey protein, a detection system specific for the bait protein is used to identify the corresponding band on the membrane. 

Far-western blotting has been used to determine receptor-ligand interactions and to screen libraries for interacting proteins. With this method of analysis, it is possible to study the effect of post-translational modifications on protein-protein interactions, examine interaction sequences using synthetic peptides as probes and identify protein-protein interactions without using antigen-specific antibodies. See here for details.

Answer Id:: E15620

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Do you offer FlowCytomix assays? Product FAQ

Answer

Sorry, the FlowCytomix product line has been discontinued. However, we offer a new antibody and magnetic bead-based detection system, i.e., ProcartaPlex assays for multiplex protein quantitation using the Luminex instrument platform.

Answer Id:: E17196

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What are the specifications for the 7900HT Fast Real-Time PCR System? Product FAQ

Answer

Instrument Specifications
Block Options (Interchangeable)
96-well (standard), 96-well (Fast), 384-well, TaqMan Low Density Array
Sensitivity Down to 1 copy (2-fold discrimination with 99.7% confidence)
Dynamic Range 9 logs of linear dynamic range
Calibrated Dyes FAM, SYBR, VIC, ROX, NED, TAMRA, JOE, TET dyes
Detection Method SYBR dye, primer-probe detection
Resolution Detect changes as little as 1.5-fold
Reaction Volume Range 20-50 µL Standard 96-well, 10-30 µL Fast 96-well block, 5-20 µL 384-well, ~ 1 µL 384-well TaqMan Low Density Array
Reaction Speed 9600 emulation mode, Standard, and Fast
Optics Extended-life 488 nm argon-ion laser excitation source
No filters (CCD acts as spectrograph with continuous detection 500-650 nm)

Temperature Range 4-100 degrees C
Run Time <2 hr (standard mode)
Approximately 35 min (Fast mode)

Temperature Accuracy plus or minus 0.25 degrees C (between 35 degrees C and 95 degrees C, after 3 min)
Temperature Uniformity plus or minu 0.5 degrees C (after 30 sec)
Thermal Cycling System Peltier-based system
Available Applications Gene expression, genotyping, copy number variation, HRM, protein thermal shift, protein detection, mutation detection, miRNA, presence/absence
Dimensions 72 cm (W) x 84 cm (D) x 64 cm (H) (with drawer open)
Weight 82 kg (180 lb) without automation accessory
114 kg (250 lb) with automation accessory
Remote Monitoring No
On-Board Memory No
Setup Configurations PC-controlled only

Answer Id:: E7246

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Is milk a good blocking reagent to use with SuperSignal West Dura Extended Duration Substrate? Product FAQ

Answer

Yes and no. Milk contains variable amounts of biotin so it should not be used with avidin/biotin detection systems. Milk also contains varying amounts of phosphoproteins that may make interfere with anti-phosphotyrosine procedures. A variety of blocking buffers are compatible with the substrate. Please see our Blocking Buffer selection table (https://www.thermofisher.com/us/en/home/life-science/protein-biology/protein-assays-analysis/western-blotting/detect-proteins-western-blot/western-blot-buffers/blocking-buffers-western-blotting.html#table).

Answer Id:: E8497

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Is milk a good blocking reagent to use with SuperSignal West Pico PLUS Chemiluminescent Substrate? Product FAQ

Answer

Yes and no. Milk contains variable amounts of biotin so it should not be used with avidin/biotin detection systems. Milk also contains varying amounts of phosphoproteins that may make interfere with anti-phosphotyrosine procedures. A variety of blocking buffers are compatible with the substrate. Please see our Blocking Buffer selection table (https://www.thermofisher.com/us/en/home/life-science/protein-biology/protein-assays-analysis/western-blotting/detect-proteins-western-blot/western-blot-buffers/blocking-buffers-western-blotting.html#table).

Answer Id:: E8521

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Is milk a good blocking reagent to use with SuperSignal West Femto Maximum Sensitivity Substrate? Product FAQ

Answer

Yes and no. Milk contains variable amounts of biotin so it should not be used with avidin/biotin detection systems. Milk also contains varying amounts of phosphoproteins that may make interfere with anti-phosphotyrosine procedures. A variety of blocking buffers are compatible with the substrate. Please see our Blocking Buffer selection table (https://www.thermofisher.com/us/en/home/life-science/protein-biology/protein-assays-analysis/western-blotting/detect-proteins-western-blot/western-blot-buffers/blocking-buffers-western-blotting.html#table).

Answer Id:: E8509

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What is the Lumio recognition sequence in the Expressway Lumio Expression and Detection System? Product FAQ

Answer

The Lumio recognition sequence is a small 6 amino acid sequence of Cys-Cys-Pro-Gly-Cys-Cys. The Lumio detection reagent binds this recognition sequence with high specificity and affinity, causing a bright fluorescent signal for real-time protein production analysis and immediate in-gel protein detection.

Answer Id:: E9637

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What can I do if little or no tagged protein appears on my western blot after my pulldown assay? Product FAQ

Answer

- The tagged protein may have been degraded. Make sure that you included a protease inhibitor cocktail in your lysis buffer.

- Confirm that the fusion protein was properly cloned into the expression vector.

- Use more lysate for the pulldown.

- Use a more sensitive detection system such as SuperSignal West Femto Maximum Sensitivity Substrate (Cat. No. 34095).

Answer Id:: E15624

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The potential of BORIS detected in the leukocytes of breast cancer patients as an early marker of tumorigenesis. Citations & References

  • Authors: D'Arcy V; Abdullaev ZK; Pore N; Docquier F; Torrano V; Chernukhin I; Smart M; Farrar D; Metodiev M; Fernandez N; Richard C; Delgado MD; Lobanenkov V; Klenova E
  • Journal: Clinical Cancer Research : An Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
Catalog #

Functional Evidence that the Self-Renewal Gene NANOG Regulates Human Tumor Development Citations & References

  • Authors: Jeter, CR; Badeaux, M; Choy, G; Chandra, D; Patrawala, L; Liu, C; Calhoun-Davis, T; Zaehres, H; Daley, GQ; Tang, DG
  • Journal: Stem Cells
Catalog #

CCHCR1 Is Up-Regulated in Skin Cancer and Associated with EGFR Expression Citations & References

  • Authors: Suomela, S; Elomaa, O; Skoog, T; Ala-Aho, R; Jeskanen, L; Paerssinen, J; Latonen, L; Grenman, R; Kere, J; Kaehaeri, VM; Saarialho-Kere, U
  • Journal: PLoS One
Catalog #

Induction of Suppressors of Cytokine Signaling by the Trichothecene Deoxynivalenol in the Mouse Citations & References

  • Authors: Amuzie, CJ; Shinozuka, J; Pestka, JJ
  • Journal: TOXICOLOGICAL SCIENCES
Catalog #
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