Citations & References

Assessment of two methods for handling blood in collection tubes with RNA stabilizing agent for surveillance of gene expression profiles with high density microarrays.

  • Authors: Thach DC, Lin B, Walter E, Kruzelock R, Rowley RK, Tibbetts C, Stenger DA
  • Journal: J Immunol Methods 2003; (283):1-2 269-279
  • PubMed ID: 14659918

Product Literature

Automated Sample Storage Resource Guide

Manual / Product Insert

(E) Thromb-Wellcotest Collection Tubes IFU

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Citations & References

Assessment of sample collection and storage methods for multicenter immunologic research in children.

  • Authors: Matheson LA, Duong TT, Rosenberg AM, Yeung RS
  • Journal: J Immunol Methods 2008; (339):1 82-89
  • PubMed ID: 18771669
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Citations & References

Assessment of sample collection and storage methods for multicenter immunologic research in children

  • Authors: Matheson, LA; Duong, TT; Rosenberg, AM; Yeung, RSM
  • Journal: JOURNAL OF IMMUNOLOGICAL METHODS 2008 1:82-89
Catalog #
  • 4339386
  • 4413750
  • N8050002(Discontinued)
  • N8050200(Discontinued)
  • N8050400(Discontinued)
  • 4441166
  • N8050002R
  • ZGEXSC9700384W
  • ZGEXSC9700384W3Y

Product Literature

Specimen Collection and Transport Solutions

Product FAQ

I want to collect my tissue culture supernatant daily for a time-course study and run all of my samples at once by ELISA. How should I store my supernatants for use with the eBioscience Platinum ELISA kits?

Answer

The supernatants can be harvested and stored -20 degrees C. Avoid freeze/thaw cycles. We recommend that you briefly centrifuge samples after collection to pellet any dead/floating cells remaining in the supernatant. Transfer to new tube for storage.

Answer Id: E14535

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Product FAQ

How does one prepare serum and plasma samples?

Answer

Serum is the liquid fraction of whole blood that is collected after the blood is allowed to clot. The clot is removed by centrifugation and the resulting supernatant, designated serum, is carefully removed using a Pasteur pipette. Plasma is produced when whole blood is collected in tubes that are treated with an anti-coagulant. The blood does not clot in the plasma tube. The cells are removed by centrifugation. The supernatant, designated plasma, is carefully removed from the cell pellet using a Pasteur pipette.

Serum preparation: Collect whole blood in a covered test tube. If commercially available tubes are to be used, the researcher should use the red topped tubes. These are Becton Dickinson Vacutainer tubes. After collection of the whole blood, allow the blood to clot by leaving it undisturbed at room temperature. This usually takes 15-30 minutes. Remove the clot by centrifuging at 1,000-2,000 x g for 10 minutes in a refrigerated centrifuge. The resulting supernatant is designated serum. Following centrifugation, it is important to immediately transfer the liquid component (=serum) into a clean polypropylene tube using a Pasteur pipette. The samples should be maintained at 2-8°C while handling. If the serum is not analyzed immediately, the serum should be apportioned into 0.5 mL aliquots and stored and transported at -20°C or lower. It is important to avoid freeze/thaw cycles because this is detrimental to many serum components. Samples which are hemolyzed, icteric, or lipemic can invalidate certain tests.

Plasma preparation: Collect whole blood into commercially available anti-coagulant treated tube, such as EDTA treated (lavender tops) or citrate treated (light blue tops). Heparinized tubes (green tops) are indicted for some applications; however, heparin can often be contaminated with endotoxin and endotoxin can stimulate white blood cells to release cytokines. Cells are removed from plasma by centrifugation for 10 minutes at 1,000-2,000 x g using a refrigerated centrifuge. Centrifugation for 15 minutes at 2,000 x g depletes platelets in the plasma sample. The resulting supernatant is designated plasma. Following centrifugation, it is important to immediately transfer the liquid component (=plasma) into a clean polypropylene tube using a Pasteur pipette. The samples should be maintained at 2-8°C while handling. If the plasma is not analyzed immediately, the plasma should be apportioned into 0.5 mL aliquots and stored and transported at -20°C, or lower. It is important to avoid freeze/thaw cycles. Samples which are hemolyzed, icteric, or lipemic can invalidate certain tests.

There are other commercially available tubes for blood sample collection. Thermo Fisher Scientific has not evaluated some of these tubes for compatibility with our ELISA kits. The commercially available serum tubes are as follows:Red: No anticoagulant. Red with black: treated with gel to help to separate the clot (not evaluated). The commercially available plasma tubes are as follows: Lavender: Treated with EDTA. Blue: Treated with citrate. Green: Treated with heparin. Grey: Treated with potassium oxalate/sodium fluoride (not evaluated). Yellow: Treated with ACD (not evaluated).

References: 1. Henry, J.B. (1979) Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods, Volume 1, W.B Saunders Company, Philadelphia, PA, p. 60. 2. Thavasu, P.W., S. Longhurst, S.P. Joel, M.L. Slevin, and F.R. Balkwill (1992) Measuring cytokine levels in blood. Importance of anticoagulants, processing, and storage conditions. J. Immunol. Methods 153:115-124.

Answer Id: E5129

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Manual / Product Insert

User Guide: Pierce NHS-Activated Agarose Slurry

Version: Jan. 2015
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Manual / Product Insert

User Manual: 49iQPS

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Product Literature

NEWLY LAUNCHED! SL Plus Centrifuge Series

Manual / Product Insert

User Guide: Ion PGM IC 200 Kit

Version: MAN0007661 Rev.C (01Apr2015)
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