You searched for: 

specific ROS detection%2C APF

Citations & References

Thymosin ß10 expression driven by the human TERT promoter induces ovarian cancer-specific apoptosis through ROS production.

  • Authors: Kim YC, Kim BG, Lee JH,
  • Journal: PLoS One (2012) 7:e35399-e35399
  • PubMed ID: 22623951

Product FAQ

What cellular processes can be analyzed with a flow cytometer?

Answer

-Calcium flux: Each of the Oregon Green™ calcium indicators binds intracellular calcium with increasing affinity, providing a sensitivity range to match many applications. Oregon Green™ probes emit green fluorescence at resting levels of Ca2+ and increase their fluorescence intensity 14-fold with increasing Ca2+ concentration. The cell-permeant formulation (Cat. No. O6807) can be loaded in cell media and is compatible with flow cytometry.
-Rhodamine-based calcium indicators comprise a range of probes for large or small changes in Ca2+ concentration. They exhibit a 50-fold increase in fluorescence upon calcium binding and offer a range of wavelengths that can be used in conjunction with GFP or green-fluorescent dyes for multiplexing. Rhod-2, AM (Cat. No. R1245MP), in particular, localizes to mitochondria and can be used with flow cytometry.
-Membrane potential: A distinctive feature of the early stages of apoptosis is the disruption of the mitochondria, including changes in membrane and redox potential. We offer a range of products specifically designed to assay mitochondrial membrane potential in live cells by flow cytometry, with minimal disruption of cellular function. The MitoProbe™ family of mitochondrial stains (Cat. Nos. M34150, M34151, and M34152) provide quick, easy, and reliable flow cytometric detection of the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential that occurs during apoptosis. MitoTracker™ dyes (Cat. Nos. M7510 and M7512) are membrane potential-dependent probes for staining mitochondria in live cells. The staining pattern of MitoTracker™ dyes is retained throughout subsequent flow cytometry immunocytochemistry, DNA end labeling, in situ hybridization, or counterstaining steps. The Mitochondrial Permeability Transition Pore Assay (Cat. No. M34153) provides a more direct method of measuring mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening than assays relying on mitochondrial membrane potential alone. The mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) is a non-specific channel formed by components from the inner and outer mitochondrial membranes, and appears to be involved in the release of mitochondrial components during cell death.
-Phagocytosis: In phagocytosis, cells internalize particulate matter such as microorganisms, and this process is important for immune responses and during the clearance of apoptotic cells. Probes for studying phagocytosis include BioParticles™ indicators—bacteria and yeast labeled with fluorescent dyes.
-Tracking phagocytosis using a quench/wash-based assay can report on simple uptake, or a pH indicator can be used to monitor stages in the pathway. We have no-wash assays labeled with pHrodo™ Red or Green (Cat. Nos. A10010, P35361, P35364, P35365, P35366, and P35367) and no-wash assays for whole blood (Cat. Nos. A10025, A10026, P35381, and P35382), all suitable for flow cytometry.
-pH changes: Sensitive pH determinations can be made in a physiological range using either fluorescent intensity or ratiometric measurements. pHrodo™ dyes (Cat. Nos. P35373 and P35372) provide signal intensity modulation from pH 2 to pH 9 and with a choice of fluorescent wavelengths. Tracking internalization of fluorescent dextran is a routine method for analyzing pH changes in cellular compartments. Dextran conjugates of pHrodo™ dyes (Cat. Nos. P35368 and P10361) provide the most complete solution by allowing discrimination of vesicles from early endosomes to lysosomes, with no quench or wash required.
-Reactive oxygen species: Cells that are environmentally stressed usually contain greatly increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). CellROX™ reagents are fluorogenic probes developed for the detection and quantitation of ROS in live cells. These cell-permeant reagents are non-fluorescent or very weakly fluorescent in the reduced state; however, when oxidized, they become brightly fluorescent and remain localized within the cell. We offer CellROX™ Green (Cat. No. C10492), CellROX™ Orange (Cat. No. C10493), and CellROX™ Deep Red (Cat. No. C10491) Assay Kits validated for flow cytometry.

Answer Id: E14827

Was this answer helpful?

Yes
No
Thank you for your response

Product FAQ

I am using the reactive oxygen species detection dye, Dihydrorhodamine 123, and when I put the dye in a solution of water and illuminate with UV light, I see a quick change in signal, even without cells. What is happening and how can I stop this?

Answer

You cannot stop it. Any time you illuminate a dye, including this one, photodegradation of the dye will lead to the production of singlet oxygen and free radicals. This in turn causes many ROS indicators, like this one, to become oxidized. If you are testing ROS using UV illumination, all you can do is use this as a baseline and subtract the signal from the sample with cells. The best you can do is reduce the illumination intensity (though this will also reduce the specific signal emission).

Answer Id: E6451

Was this answer helpful?

Yes
No
Thank you for your response

Citations & References

A novel flow-injection analysis system for evaluation of antioxidants by using sodium dichloroisocyanurate as a source of hypochlorite anion.

  • Authors: Ichiba H, Hanami K, Yagasaki K, Tanaka M, Ito H, Fukushima T,
  • Journal: Drug Discov Ther (2012) 6:44-48
  • PubMed ID: 22460428
Catalog #

Citations & References

On the use of fluorescence probes for detecting reactive oxygen and nitrogen species associated with photodynamic therapy.

  • Authors: Price M, Kessel D,
  • Journal: J Biomed Opt (2010) 15:051605-051605
  • PubMed ID: 21054079

Citations & References

Morphological and flow-cytometric analysis of haemin-induced human neutrophil activation: implications for transfusion-related acute lung injury.

  • Authors: Kono M, Saigo K, Takagi Y, Kawauchi S, Wada A, Hashimoto M, Sugimoto T, Takenokuchi M, Morikawa T, Funakoshi K,
  • Journal: Blood Transfus (2013) 11:53-60
  • PubMed ID: 22790260
Catalog #

Citations & References

Development of novel fluorescence probes that can reliably detect reactive oxygen species and distinguish specific species.

  • Authors: Setsukinai K, Urano Y, Kakinuma K, Majima HJ, Nagano T
  • Journal: J Biol Chem (2003) 278:3170-3175
  • PubMed ID: 12419811

Citations & References

Effects of Equol on Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein-induced Apoptosis in Endothelial Cells

  • Authors: Kamiyama, M; Kishimoto, Y; Tani, M; Utsunomiya, K; Kondo, K
  • Journal: Journal of Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis 2009 3:239-249

Citations & References

Curcumin inhibits UV irradiation-induced oxidative stress and apoptotic biochemical changes in human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells.

  • Authors: Chan WH, Wu CC, Yu JS
  • Journal: J Cell Biochem (2003) 90:327-338
  • PubMed ID: 14505349
Catalog #

Citations & References

Mechanism of all-trans retinoic acid effect on tumor-associated myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

  • Authors: Nefedova Y, Fishman M, Sherman S, Wang X, Beg AA, Gabrilovich DI
  • Journal: Cancer Res 2007; (67):22 11021-11028
  • PubMed ID: 18006848

Product Literature

White Paper: Culture Microbiology Review - Vol. 1, No. 1, March 1980

Citations & References

Genome-wide expression of transcriptomes and their co-expression pattern in subtropical maize (Zea mays L.) under waterlogging stress.

  • Authors: Thirunavukkarasu N, Hossain F, Mohan S, Shiriga K, Mittal S, Sharma R, Singh RK, Gupta HS
  • Journal: PLoS One 2013; (8):8 e70433-e70433
  • PubMed ID: 23936429

Citations & References

Free radical-independent protection by nerve growth factor and Bcl-2 of PC12 cells from hydrogen peroxide-triggered apoptosis.

  • Authors: Satoh T, Sakai N, Enokido Y, Uchiyama Y, Hatanaka H
  • Journal: J Biochem (Tokyo) (1996) 120:540-546
  • PubMed ID: 8902618
Catalog #