Tradeshow
Jun 05, 2022 - Jun 09, 2022
ASMS 2022 - Conference on Mass Spectrometry and Allied Topics

We hope you’ll join us in-person at ASMS 2022 in Minneapolis. Your vision is the driving force behind scientific breakthroughs, discoveries and results that benefit human health. It’s your visionary ideas that push us to deliver innovations at each step in a complete end-to-end mass spectrometry workflow – sample to analysis – that enable the highest confidence in your scientific outcomes.

At this year’s ASMS learn about latest innovations that scale the molecular spectrum. From targeted and small molecule quantitation, through advancements in high throughput quantitative proteomics and bio-molecular characterization, to a revolution in intuitive, AI-driven software for leading-edge biological research. Our experts and collaborative partners will be onsite all week in Booth 400, so be sure to stop by.

Please bookmark this webpage to stay up to date for registration details on our entire lineup of technical posters, presentations, workshops, user meetings and other customer-focused events happening throughout the week.

We look forward to seeing and partnering with you at ASMS 2022.

Register to attend our lineup of Users' meetings, Breakfast workshops and Customer Hospitality event at ASMS 2022.

HiltonMinneapolis-HospitalitySuite-1778x1175

Stop by our Hospitality Suite!

Hilton Minneapolis – 3rd Floor
(Connected via the skyway to the Convention Center)
1001 S Marquette Ave South
Minneapolis, MN 55403

We can’t wait to see you in our hospitality suite this year at the Hilton Minneapolis. Make sure to stop by and:

  • Grab a beverage and speak to our experts regarding your most technical questions
  • Learn about our newest products and innovations


Booth 400

Minneapolis Convention Center
1301 2nd Ave S, Minneapolis, MN 55404



Users' meeting

Please see the lists below for which Users' meeting track you are interested in registering for.


Agenda

Sunday, June  05, 2022

 

Continental Breakfast & Registration

Hyatt Regency Minneapolis - Nicollet Promenade
7:30 a.m. [CDT]


Introduction

Hyatt Regency Minneapolis - Nicollet A-B-C
8:30 a.m. [CDT]

Your vision is the driving force behind scientific breakthroughs, pushing us to deliver new innovations. you will hear about the latest advances in mass spectrometry, focusing on improving your outcomes for each step in complete end-to-end workflows.

Speaker: Iain Mylchreest, Ph.D., Vice President, Research and Development, Analytical Instruments Group, Thermo Fisher Scientific


Keynote: Direct Mass Technology reveal biomolecular signatures in unprecedented detail

Hyatt Regency Minneapolis - Nicollet A-B-C
8:50 a.m. [CDT]

Learn about the new Direct Mass Technology mode reveals biomolecular signatures in unprecedented detail.

Speaker: Neil Kelleher, Ph.D., Walter and Elizabeth Mary Glass Professor, Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University


Visionary Panel Discussion

Hyatt Regency Minneapolis - Nicollet A-B-C
9:20 a.m. [CDT]

Come discuss what is the future for mass spectrometry with a visionary panel of rising stars and established experts.

Host: Rosy Lee, M.S., Vice President/General Manager, Life Sciences Mass Spectrometry, Thermo Fisher Scientific

Speakers: Devin K Schweppe, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Genome Sciences, University of Washington;
Lindsay Pino, Ph.D., CTO, Talus Bio;
Christopher Ashwood, Ph.D., Director Glycomics Core, Harvard University;
Benjamin A. Garcia, Ph.D., FRSC, Raymond H. Wittcoff Distinguished Professor and Head Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, Washington University in St. Louis, School of Medicine;
Jennifer Van Eyk, Professor of Medicine, Cedars-Sinai Smidt Heart Institute;
Erika J. Glazer Chair at Women's Heart Health., Cedars-Sinai Smidt Heart Institute;
Jonathan Bones, Ph.D. , Principal Investigator, NIBRT

Precision Medicine: Individualizing Assessment and Therapies

Hyatt Regency Minneapolis - Nicollet A-B-C
10:00 - 10:20 a.m. [CDT]

Precision medicine is driven by the concept that an individual’s Omic (proteomic) signature will provide a physician with a clinically actionable diagnosis and subsequent mechanistic therapeutic route. Continuous monitoring of circulating protein biomarkers is an unmet opportunity to assess an individual’s health in real-time as part of disease management and preventive clinical care. Simultaneously there is a need to increase the breadth of therapeutics available and to identify the appropriate therapy(ies) for each individual based on analysis of their cellular avatar.  Enablement requires automation, scalability and normalization of proteomics while balancing cost effectiveness in the discovery and clinical domains.

Speaker: Jenny Van Eyk, PhD., Advanced Clinical Biosystems, Precision Biomarker Laboratories, Smit Heart Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center.


Deep quantification of activated signaling networks to identify therapeutic targets using SureQuant pTyr 2.0

Hyatt Regency Minneapolis - Nicollet A-B-C
10:25 - 10:45 a.m. [CDT]

Aberrantly activated protein phosphorylation signaling networks drive tumor progression. Tyrosine phosphorylation plays a critical role in this process, yet is challenging to identify and quantify due to the low abundance of most pTyr sites. Here we present SureQuant pTyr 2.0, a method enabling the targeted quantification of >1100 pTyr sites across almost all facets of cell biology. Application of SureQuant pTyr 2.0 to cell lines and tumor specimens quantified activated signaling networks with high sensitivity and reproducibility, enabling the identification of putative therapeutic targets from small amounts of starting material.

Speaker: Forest White, Department of Biological Engineering, MIT


Leveraging protein-protein interaction analysis to understand disease pathology

Hyatt Regency Minneapolis - Nicollet A-B-C
10:50 - 11:10 a.m. [CDT]

Protein-protein interaction analysis represents a powerful methodology to identify drivers of disease pathology, which subsequently alter downstream signaling and cellular phenotypes. Furthermore, there is a growing appreciation that such interactions can be highly variable depending upon the cellular context or protein mutational state. Here we present an analysis of disease modulated protein-protein interactions and show how this information can be used to interpret clinical phenotypes and identify actionable drug targets.

Speaker: Danielle Swaney, PhD., Assistant Professor, UCSF


Characterizing Viral Proteins and Particles with Native Mass Spectrometry

Hyatt Regency Minneapolis - Nicollet A-B-C
11:15 - 11:35 a.m. [CDT]

Many viruses encode small ion channels that play a range of different roles in infection. These underexplored drug targets can be sensitive to subtle changes in their chemical environment, especially the surrounding lipid bilayer. Using native mass spectrometry and lipoprotein nanodiscs, we are studying how lipids, drugs, and pH affect viral ion channels from a range of viruses. We have also used charge detection-mass spectrometry to study the structure and stability of intact viral capsids, which are important emerging pharmaceutical platforms. These advances in mass spectrometry technology provide new avenues for helping to understand and treat infectious disease.

Speaker: Dr. Michael Marty, Associate Professor, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arizona

Charge Detection Mass Spectrometry: A Pharmaceutical Perspective

Hyatt Regency Minneapolis - Nicollet D
10:00 - 10:20 a.m. [CDT]

The COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus, has claimed the lives of over 6 million people globally. The fast-paced development of virus vaccine candidates while maintaining safety and efficacy highlights the need for an advanced analytical toolkit, including mass spectrometry, for product and process characterization. Here, we show how charge detection mass spectrometry (CDMS) was utilized to characterize highly heterogeneous intact spike glycoprotein trimers as well as various intact mRNA constructs. The observed masses are in good agreement with orthogonal methods such as size-exclusion chromatography coupled to multi-angle light scattering (SEC-MALS) and field flow fractionation (FFF), demonstrating the possibility of using this new-to-industry method to obtain molecular mass information of highly heterogeneous reagents used in vaccine development. The established CDMS methods can be leveraged for future vaccine development.

Speaker: Dave Foreman, Merck


Fully Integrated Automation for Protein Characterization and Biologics Development

Hyatt Regency Minneapolis - Nicollet D
10:25 - 10:45 a.m. [CDT]

For protein biotherapeutics, the generation of a manufacturing cell line to support product development is a critical step. This involves screening hundreds of cell-lines per program by high-resolution analytical mass-spectrometry to ensure desired product quality. However typically mass-spectrometry is a time-consuming and complex technique involving sample preparation, data analysis and interpretation. We have developed an end-to-end analytical pipeline using robotic automation to integrate laboratory equipment enabling purification, enzymatic processing and data acquisition. Six analytical instruments, and 19 peripheral devices are centrally controlled through automation. Samples for intact, subunit and peptide mapping are acquired on Thermo Exploris 480 systems and the data is funneled into custom enterprise software for analysis and report generation. The system represents a lab-of-the-future concept eliminating the need for manual sample preparation and instrument operation, thereby improving consistency, bandwidth, and accelerating early molecule development.

Speaker: Hirsh Nanda, Director, Cell Engineering & Early Development, Janssen R&D


Characterization Strategies for AAV Gene Therapies

Hyatt Regency Minneapolis - Nicollet D
10:50 - 11:10 a.m. [CDT]

Gene therapies based on viral and non-viral vectors have come to the fore based on the transformational clinical potential offered by these medicines. Adeno associated viral vectors (AAV) used for viral based delivery represent a considerable manufacturing and characterisation challenge based on their molecular size, complexity, and general availability in limited quantities. Here, we will present strategies for, and practical examples of, the characterisation of AAV gene therapies comprising MS and LC-MS based approaches on different levels for product and process related contaminant analysis. We will present native MS analysis of intact capsids for fill state determination, LC-MS analysis of capsid proteins, peptide mapping workflows for capsid protein sequence confirmation and posttranslational modification analysis and determination of residual host cell proteins. Application to upstream development and downstream processing of AAV will be discussed.

Speaker: Jonathan Bones, Principal Investigator, NIBRT Characterisation and Comparability Lab


Multiple Dissociations and MSn Capabilities with AcquireX Workflow of Orbitrap IQ-X Tribrid MS for Small Molecule Structure Characterization

Hyatt Regency Minneapolis - Nicollet D
11:15 - 11:35 a.m.[CDT]

Impurity profiling and structure characterization by LCMS is an integral part of drug R&D to ensure drug efficacy and patient safety. High resolution mass spectrometry with multiple dissociations and high level MS/MS (MSn) capabilities provided crucial fragmentation fingerprint information for API and drug product impurity profiling and structure characterization.

In this study, Adefovir and AMG-510 impurity profiling was conducted using an LCMS system consisting of a Thermo Scientific Vanquish UHPLC and an Orbitrap IQ-X Tribrid mass spectrometer. HCD, UVPD, and CID dissociation techniques with MSn fragmentation were utilized to obtain in-depth structure information. AcquireX, a real-time decision-making data acquisition workflow, was also used to optimize MSn quality. The information-rich MSn data were processed and impurity structures proposed using “Compound Discoverer” software.

Speaker: Sarah J. Robinson, Genentech

Harnessing metabolomics as platform for rapid diagnostics

Hyatt Regency Minneapolis - Lakeshore B-C
10:00 - 10:20 a.m. [CDT]

Clinical microbiology testing plays a pivotal role in the management of infectious diseases. Despite this, identifying microbes (ID) and measure their antibiotic susceptibility profiles (AST) using traditional methods can take 2-5 days. This is a serious problem in the context of blood stream infections, where a single day of delay in prescribing the correct antibiotic can increase mortality rates by 5%. Over the last 5 years, the Lewis research group has worked to develop a new liquid chromatography mass spectrometry approach that could replace the traditional clinical microbiology pipeline. We will describe how this metabolomics-based platform can be leveraged to complete ID and AST testing in less than 4 hours and discuss the first clinical trials of this technology in Alberta hospitals.

Speaker: Ian Lewis, Assistant Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Calgary


Rapid Metabolic Profiling of Clinical Samples to Guide Treatment Decisions for Patients with the MasSpec Pen Technology

Hyatt Regency Minneapolis - Lakeshore B-C
10:25 - 10:45 a.m. [CDT]

Technologies that enable intraoperative tissue analysis and diagnosis are critically needed to guide surgical procedures and improve patient outcomes. Here we demonstrate the MasSpec Pen technology as a handheld device, integrated to a mass spectrometer, for rapid and direct molecular analysis of biological samples. Coupled with statistical modeling, we show that this rapid (<15s), non-destructive technology enables tissue classification and cancer diagnosis with high accuracy. Today’s presentation will describe recent developments and results translating MasSpec Pen technology integrated with an Orbitrap mass spectrometer to the clinic and operating rooms for in vivo tissue analysis and diagnosis. Technical developments and diagnostic performance in cancer surgery will also be discussed, as well as new opportunities and applications in the clinical setting.

Speaker: Livia Eberlin, Baylor College of Medicine


Development of a multiplexed assay of sphingolipids for clinical practice

Hyatt Regency Minneapolis - Lakeshore B-C
10:50 - 11:10 a.m. [CDT]

Lipids are ubiquitous in human biology and play roles in many cellular and intercellular processes. Inborn errors of lipid metabolism involve disturbances in the levels of lipids, namely mutational defects of enzymes involved in a metabolic pathway. A growing number of nervous system disorders report disturbances in the sphingolipid pathway including Farber disease, which is caused by deficiency of acid ceramidase (ASAH1) by the enzyme defect of dihydroceramide desaturase (DEGS1).

Although several mass spectrometric assays measuring sphingolipids for several lysosomal disorders are currently offered by our clinical laboratory, an assay that can analyze additional sphingolipids such as ceramides and deoxyceramides is needed. Multiplexing targets in a single assay that can screen multiple conditions or disorders can help the patients and physicians by saving time and cost. Mutations in enzymes from the de novo pathway of sphingolipids lead to various genetic disorders and a multiplexed assay that can quantify the plasma and serum lipids involved in the de novo pathway of sphingolipids (3-keto-sphinganine, sphinganine, sphingosine, dihydroceramides and ceramides) has been developed using the Thermo Scientific Vanquish Duo UHPLC coupled to a Thermo Scientific TSQ Altis mass spectrometer in this study. In addition, deoxysphingolipids synthesized from the condensation of palmitoyl-CoA and alanine have been reported to be implicated in various disorders including hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1. This assay also targets deoxy-ceramides, deoxy-dihydroceramides, deoxy-sphingosine and deoxy-sphinganine; with the measurements of all analytes from the synthesis pathway for ceramides/1-deoxy-ceramides, patients with relevant enzyme defects can be identified.

Speaker: Seul Kee Byeon, Ph.D, Mayo Clinic


Addressing the Challenges Confronting Breath Biopsy for Clinical Early Detection & Precision Medicine

Hyatt Regency Minneapolis - Lakeshore B-C
11:15 - 11:35 a.m. [CDT]

Breath is a rich matrix containing a vast selection of possible diagnostic biomarkers that could be accessed through non-invasive sampling. While the diagnostic potential of breath has been recognised since ancient times, few clinical breath tests have yet been approved for use. Key challenges in the field include the capability to reliably detect standardized breath samples, the analytical capacity to reproducibly detect potential biomarkers, and the biological insights to relate biomarkers on breath to key disease processes. GC-MS remains the gold standard for detecting and identifying biologically-relevant compounds on breath. Owlstone Medical have sought to maximize the potential to find and establish novel breath biomarkers by developing Breath Biopsy. Together with leading researchers in academia and industry, Owlstone have created devices and analytical solutions to support the development of breath-based clinical tests. This includes ReCIVA® Breath Sampler, a collection device that prioritizes standardization and reproducibility to generate robust data. This presentation will introduce the challenges of breath research, discuss how Breath Biopsy addresses these challenges and share some of the lessons learnt and expert insights gained through the process of developing Breath Biopsy OMNI, a complete end-to-end solution for analysis of volatile organic compounds on breath.

Speaker: Shane Swann, Owlstone Medical Limited

Enhanced PFAS detection in fish from AFFF-impacted surface waters on an Orbitrap Exploris 240 Mass Spectrometer

Hyatt Regency Minneapolis - Lakeshore A
10:00 - 10:20 a.m. [CDT]

The use of aqueous film-forming foam (AFFF) containing per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) has led to extensive environmental contamination. To evaluate the potential accumulation of a wide-suite of AFFF-derived PFASs in fish, fish tissues were collected from recreational ponds with elevated PFASs near AFFF-impacted sites. Tissues were homogenized, extracted, and analyzed by liquid chromatography high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). Target PFASS were quantified, and suspect screening was performed using the NIST PFAS Suspect List and MS2 libraries. Both legacy PFASs and a number of recently identified suspect PFASs were detected. Though PFOS remains one of the most abundant PFASs AFFF-impacted fish tissues, it also highlights the utility of HRMS suspect lists and libraries for monitoring for novel PFASs in biota.

Speaker: Professor Christopher P. Higgins, Colorado School of Mines


Confident analysis of volatile organic compounds in accordance with EPA regulations

Hyatt Regency Minneapolis - Lakeshore A
10:25 - 10:45 a.m. [CDT]

Volatile Organic Compounds or VOCs are produced by various industrial activities and prevalent in the environment. These compounds have an adverse effect on the environment and human health if exposure occurs. In order to protect the public, there are number of regulations in place to monitor the presence of VOCs in the environment. Purge and Trap (P&T) coupled with GC-MS is the analytical instrumentation of choice for laboratories monitoring VOCs in water and soil. The methods must meet the regulatory demands and analytical testing laboratories must be able to produce consistent results with sustained sample throughput. In this presentation our experts will guide you through a review of current regulatory requirements for P&T analysis in accordance with current regulations with specific examples including US EPA 524.2 and 8260. Teledyne Tekmar P&T experts will give an overview of the advantages of the P&T system combined with the new Thermo Scientific ISQ 7610 GC-MS system with in-depth data examples. The common challenges that can impact P&T workflows for EPA methods will be covered and practical examples of how these challenges can be overcome will be discussed.

Speaker: Amy Nutter , Teledyne Tekmar


Advances in LC-HRMS as a Powerful Tool for Food Quality Control

Hyatt Regency Minneapolis - Lakeshore A
10:50 - 11:10 a.m. [CDT]

The new LC 240 Exploris Orbitrap offer new capabilities to focus on food quality. We consider here the improved capability in pesticide residue control as a consequence of the increased scan speed that allows acquisition modes of Full scan, data dependent, all ion fragmentation and product ion scan simultaneously. With this a notable increase in the sensitivity is achieved keeping other facilities such as; detection of compounds out of the regular scope and analysis a posteriori. We have explored similarly the fast detection of food contact materials from plastic covers commonly present in precooked or ready-to-eat food.

Speaker: Amadeo R. Fernández-Alba, European Union Reference Laboratory for Pesticide Residues in Fruit & Vegetables- University of Almería


Environmental exposomics using wristbands and GC Orbitrap MS

Hyatt Regency Minneapolis - Lakeshore A
11:15 - 11:35 a.m. [CDT]

Using wearable passive sampler to absorb chemicals, and then measuring chemicals in the lab using high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS), is an emerging technology for comprehensively characterizing the airborne exposome. We apply our in-house passive sampling technology (FreshAir) and show the ability to detect a wide range of chemicals from PFAS to pesticides, showing seasonal, geographical, and behavioral trends across the globe. For suspect screening, alongside NIST/WILEY libraries novel in-silico rule-based PFAS libraries were developed. A new set of criteria and filters were developed to communicate confidence in GC-HRMS following the Schymanski et al. approach. Using this approach, we were able to confidently assign thousands of chemicals people are exposed to across the world, and determine those of most concern (spoiler alert: indoor application of biocides and pesticides by participants). We validated our new set of criteria and filters using spiked standards in human serum, and in our FreshAir passive sampling approach, and found in both cases when specific filters are used that a 10% false positive rate in suspect screening annotations can be achieved.

Speaker: Dr. Elizabeth Lin, Yale School of Public Health

Customer Hospitality Event

Hyatt Regency Minneapolis - Lakeshore A

1110 Nicollet Mall
Minneapolis, MN 55403

After attending our Users’ Meeting on Sunday, we hope you’ll join us for our Customer Hospitality Event at Brit’s Pub & Eating Establishment – right down the street! We’ll have the entire space to ourselves; both indoor and outdoor. Come join us to unwind and network while enjoying some great food and drinks. We’ll also have lawn bowling and some rounds of quizzes in the pub.

*Attendance to our Hospitality event requires proof of attendance to our Users’ meeting. Please bring your preregistration badge with you.

Breakfast workshops

Please see the lists below for which Breakfast workshop you are interested in registering for.


New Developments in Mass spectrometry based Single-Cell Proteomics

Thermo Fisher Hospitality Suite - Grand Ballroom E-F
7:00 - 8:00 a.m. [CDT]

The analysis of single cell proteomes has recently become a viable complement to transcriptomics and genomics studies. Proteins are the main driver of cellular functionality and mRNA levels are often an unreliable proxy of such. Therefore, the global analysis of the proteome is essential to study cellular identities. Both multiplexed and label-free mass spectrometry-based approaches with single cell resolution have lately attributed surprising heterogeneity to believed homogenous cell populations. Even though specialized experimental designs and instrumentation have demonstrated remarkable advances, the efficient sample preparation of single cells still lacks behind. Here, we introduce the proteoCHIP, an universal option for single cell proteomics sample preparation at surprising sensitivity and throughput. The automated processing using a commercial system combining single cell isolation and picoliter dispensing, the cellenONE®, allows to reduce final sample volumes to low nanoliters submerged in a hexadecane layer simultaneously eliminating error prone manual sample handling and overcoming evaporation. The specialized proteoCHIP design allows for the direct injection of single cells via a standard autosampler resulting in around 1,500 protein groups per analytical run at remarkable reporter ion signal to noise while reducing or eliminating the carrier proteome. We identified close to 2,600 proteins across 170 multiplexed single cells from two highly similar human cell types. This dedicated loss-less workflow allows to distinguish in vitro co-differentiated cell types of self-organizing cardiac organoids based on indicative markers across 150 single cells. In-depth characterization revealed enhanced cellular motility of endothelial cells and acute myocardium sarcomere organization in cardiomyocytes. Our versatile, and automated sample preparation has not only proven to be easily adoptable but is also sufficiently sensitive to drive biological applications of single cell proteomics.

Speaker: Karl Mechtler, Vienna BioCenter - Core Facilities


Comprehensive LC-MS characterization of synthetic single guide RNAs in CRISPR: from bottom-up to top-down

Thermo Fisher Hospitality Suite - Grand Ballroom G
7:00 - 8:00 a.m. [CDT]

In recent years, CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing has become an important tool in biomedical research and has demonstrated tremendous therapeutic potential. Single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) are one of the critical reagents to allow for sequence specific cutting in CRISPR. Therefore, the design and quality of the sgRNAs can greatly affect the efficiency and the specificity of genome editing. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is a powerful tool to detect molecular features from oligonucleotide samples. However, as the size of the oligonucleotides gets larger, many challenges arise. Here we showcase a suite of LC-MS methods ranging from bottom-up digestion to top-down approaches to sequence and characterize 100-nucleotide long synthetic guide RNAs.

Speakers: Bifan Chen, Senior Scientist, Small Molecule Analytical Chemistry, Genentech Research & Early Development, Genentech

High-resolution MS Imaging meets Orbitrap technology

Thermo Fisher Hospitality Suite - Grand Ballroom G
7:00 - 8:00 a.m. [CDT]

Atmospheric-pressure scanning microprobe MALDI mass spectrometry imaging (APSMALDI MSI) on orbital trapping mass spectrometers with SRIG or ion funnel inlets allows to disclose distinct morphologic distributions of lipids, peptides, drugs and metabolites in complex biological samples (tissues, cells, sub-cellular structures) with highest sensitivity, accuracy and resolution under ambient conditions. [1] We
developed various AP-SMALDI Orbitrap systems for high-performance imaging of planar and non-planar (three-dimensional) surfaces. Coaxial, orthogonal imaging was employed for highest lateral resolution on Orbitrap Exploris 120, 240 and 480 instruments. The systems provide pixelwise autofocusing operation, high-speed analysis and surface-topography imaging by three-dimensional scanning with 5 μm
laser spots. [2, 3].

Our AP-SMALDI Orbitrap MSI technology has been applied to a broad range of divers applicational fields such as veterinary medicine, plant sciences, cell biology, cancer research, neuroscience, parasite-host interactions, bacterial biofilms, drug discovery and others (see publication list on www.smaldi.de).

[1] B. Spengler B, Anal Chem 2015, 87, 64−82.
[2] M. Kompauer et al., Nature Methods 2017, 14, 90-96.
[3] M. Kompauer et al., Nature Methods 2017, 14, 1156-1158.

Speaker: Professor Dr. Bernhard Spengler, Justus Liebig University, and Director of the TransMIT Center


A New Experience in Automated Proteomics Sample Preparation

Thermo Fisher Hospitality Suite - Grand Ballroom E-F
7:00 - 8:00 a.m. [CDT]

Break free from the time, cost and complexity of manual sample preparation. This workshop will discuss the challenges of automated proteomics sample preparation and what's needed to overcome these so that scientists can achieve high quality experimental results,and focus their time on more valuable tasks. Attributes such as ease-of-use, experimental design, flexible workflows, and integration into existing proteomics infrastructure will be discussed with the scientific community.

Speakers: Daniel Lopez Ferrer, PhD, Dir. Proteomics and Translational Research, Thermo Fisher Scientific;
Maowei Dou, PhD, Scientist III, Protein Biology, Thermo Fisher Scientific

Orbitrap Analyzers: Turning an M/Z-Spectrometer into a MASS-Spectrometer

Thermo Fisher Hospitality Suite - Grand Ballroom G
7:00 - 8:00 a.m. [CDT]

A close 5-year collaboration between the Kelleher group at Northwestern University and Thermo Fisher Scientific has fostered an important investigation about the use of individual ions for direct mass spectrometry analysis. It has been determined that detecting individual ion signals, rather than traditional packets of ions, advances Orbitrap-based resolution and charge detection capabilities. To this end, individual ion mass spectrometry alters spectral outputs directly into the Dalton domain to deconvolute complex protein mixtures and determine mass distributions for large virus-like particles ranging from 8 kDa to 6 MDa. Direct Mass Technologies coupled with easy to handle analysis software advances charge detection capabilities to the scientific community at large.

Speaker:
Jared O. Kafader, Northwestern University Project


How to Get Started in Single Cell Proteomics - A Practical Guide

Thermo Fisher Hospitality Suite - Grand Ballroom E-F
7:00 - 8:00 a.m. [CDT]

The high throughput multiplexed single cell (Sc) proteomics workflow includes several crucial steps: (1) single-cell sorting and isolation (2) sample preparation and TMT labelling 3) optimized TMT sample analysis with LC-MS and 4) data visualization and interpretation. There are experimental considerations and critical steps throughout the workflow that can impact results and determine the success of a study. This workshop will provide you with practical insights that will deliver a well-planned and executed experiment that enables accurate data and insightful conclusions.

Speakers: Anjali Seth, PhD, Head of Single Cell Proteomics, Cellenion, France; Ryan Kelly, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, USA

Increasing sample throughput in ultra-trace environmental analysis with GC-MS/MS

Convention Center, 200-HI
7:00 - 8:00 a.m. [CDT]

Ultra-trace analysis of environmental contaminants including dioxins, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated biphenyls (PBDEs) is key to public safety. These persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are toxic to wildlife and humans and must be monitored in the environment to limit exposure.  GC-MS/MS technology has been widely adopted for the analysis of POPs, due to its flexibility and robustness. GC-MS/MS is able to reach the regulatory limits complex matrices due to the selectivity, sensitivity and accuracy of the technique. These attributes allow the user to have an increased instrument uptime due to the limited maintenance needed on the system, even when analyzing complex food and environmental samples. This is extremely important to a commercial laboratory since time is money. In this presentation Pacific Rim Laboratories will discuss the work the laboratory has performed in collaboration with Thermo Fisher Scientific to evaluate the new Thermo Scientific TSQ 9610 Triple Quadrupole GC-MS/MS System. The presentation will cover how Pacific Rim Laboratories was able to increase instrument uptime and improve sample throughput. Discussion will include the analysis of various POPs including low level Dioxins and PCBs, PBDEs and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs). The method consolidation of PBDE, OCP and marker PCBs in a single run for the analysis of fish oil will be demonstrated. Finally, analysis of emerging compounds of interest in the environment including Chlorophenolics will also be presented.

Speaker: Kjell Hope, Pacific Rim Laboratories


Advances in LC-HRMS Metabolomics and Lipidomics for disease diagnostics

Convention Center, 200-J
7:00 - 8:00 a.m. [CDT]

Metabolomics refers to the comprehensive measurement of small molecules in biofluids by mass spectrometry to provide new insights into disease etiologies. Lipidomics is a subset of metabolomics focused specifically on the analysis of lipid species. MS based ‘Omics couples the use of LC to separate metabolites based on polarity and high-resolution MS to accurately measure the m/z. These ‘Omics also represent the merging of many disciplines. It covers knowledge of metabolism, analytical measurement and statistical analysis as well as integrated pathway mapping in order to unravel cellular complexities.  Work in disease diagnostics merges analytical capabilities with informatics to develop better diagnostics. This talk will discuss metabolomics in the context of meningioma and Fabry.

Speaker: Timothy J Garrett, PhD, Associate Professor, Departments of Pathology and Chemistry, University of Florida

Posters


Coming soon.

Videos


Coming soon.

Users' meeting

Please see the lists below for which Users' meeting track you are interested in registering for.


Agenda

Sunday, June  05, 2022

 

Continental Breakfast & Registration

Hyatt Regency Minneapolis - Nicollet Promenade
7:30 a.m. [CDT]


Introduction

Hyatt Regency Minneapolis - Nicollet A-B-C
8:30 a.m. [CDT]

Your vision is the driving force behind scientific breakthroughs, pushing us to deliver new innovations. you will hear about the latest advances in mass spectrometry, focusing on improving your outcomes for each step in complete end-to-end workflows.

Speaker: Iain Mylchreest, Ph.D., Vice President, Research and Development, Analytical Instruments Group, Thermo Fisher Scientific


Keynote: Direct Mass Technology reveal biomolecular signatures in unprecedented detail

Hyatt Regency Minneapolis - Nicollet A-B-C
8:50 a.m. [CDT]

Learn about the new Direct Mass Technology mode reveals biomolecular signatures in unprecedented detail.

Speaker: Neil Kelleher, Ph.D., Walter and Elizabeth Mary Glass Professor, Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University


Visionary Panel Discussion

Hyatt Regency Minneapolis - Nicollet A-B-C
9:20 a.m. [CDT]

Come discuss what is the future for mass spectrometry with a visionary panel of rising stars and established experts.

Host: Rosy Lee, M.S., Vice President/General Manager, Life Sciences Mass Spectrometry, Thermo Fisher Scientific

Speakers: Devin K Schweppe, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Genome Sciences, University of Washington;
Lindsay Pino, Ph.D., CTO, Talus Bio;
Christopher Ashwood, Ph.D., Director Glycomics Core, Harvard University;
Benjamin A. Garcia, Ph.D., FRSC, Raymond H. Wittcoff Distinguished Professor and Head Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, Washington University in St. Louis, School of Medicine;
Jennifer Van Eyk, Professor of Medicine, Cedars-Sinai Smidt Heart Institute;
Erika J. Glazer Chair at Women's Heart Health., Cedars-Sinai Smidt Heart Institute;
Jonathan Bones, Ph.D. , Principal Investigator, NIBRT

Precision Medicine: Individualizing Assessment and Therapies

Hyatt Regency Minneapolis - Nicollet A-B-C
10:00 - 10:20 a.m. [CDT]

Precision medicine is driven by the concept that an individual’s Omic (proteomic) signature will provide a physician with a clinically actionable diagnosis and subsequent mechanistic therapeutic route. Continuous monitoring of circulating protein biomarkers is an unmet opportunity to assess an individual’s health in real-time as part of disease management and preventive clinical care. Simultaneously there is a need to increase the breadth of therapeutics available and to identify the appropriate therapy(ies) for each individual based on analysis of their cellular avatar.  Enablement requires automation, scalability and normalization of proteomics while balancing cost effectiveness in the discovery and clinical domains.

Speaker: Jenny Van Eyk, PhD., Advanced Clinical Biosystems, Precision Biomarker Laboratories, Smit Heart Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center.


Deep quantification of activated signaling networks to identify therapeutic targets using SureQuant pTyr 2.0

Hyatt Regency Minneapolis - Nicollet A-B-C
10:25 - 10:45 a.m. [CDT]

Aberrantly activated protein phosphorylation signaling networks drive tumor progression. Tyrosine phosphorylation plays a critical role in this process, yet is challenging to identify and quantify due to the low abundance of most pTyr sites. Here we present SureQuant pTyr 2.0, a method enabling the targeted quantification of >1100 pTyr sites across almost all facets of cell biology. Application of SureQuant pTyr 2.0 to cell lines and tumor specimens quantified activated signaling networks with high sensitivity and reproducibility, enabling the identification of putative therapeutic targets from small amounts of starting material.

Speaker: Forest White, Department of Biological Engineering, MIT


Leveraging protein-protein interaction analysis to understand disease pathology

Hyatt Regency Minneapolis - Nicollet A-B-C
10:50 - 11:10 a.m. [CDT]

Protein-protein interaction analysis represents a powerful methodology to identify drivers of disease pathology, which subsequently alter downstream signaling and cellular phenotypes. Furthermore, there is a growing appreciation that such interactions can be highly variable depending upon the cellular context or protein mutational state. Here we present an analysis of disease modulated protein-protein interactions and show how this information can be used to interpret clinical phenotypes and identify actionable drug targets.

Speaker: Danielle Swaney, PhD., Assistant Professor, UCSF


Characterizing Viral Proteins and Particles with Native Mass Spectrometry

Hyatt Regency Minneapolis - Nicollet A-B-C
11:15 - 11:35 a.m. [CDT]

Many viruses encode small ion channels that play a range of different roles in infection. These underexplored drug targets can be sensitive to subtle changes in their chemical environment, especially the surrounding lipid bilayer. Using native mass spectrometry and lipoprotein nanodiscs, we are studying how lipids, drugs, and pH affect viral ion channels from a range of viruses. We have also used charge detection-mass spectrometry to study the structure and stability of intact viral capsids, which are important emerging pharmaceutical platforms. These advances in mass spectrometry technology provide new avenues for helping to understand and treat infectious disease.

Speaker: Dr. Michael Marty, Associate Professor, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arizona

Charge Detection Mass Spectrometry: A Pharmaceutical Perspective

Hyatt Regency Minneapolis - Nicollet D
10:00 - 10:20 a.m. [CDT]

The COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus, has claimed the lives of over 6 million people globally. The fast-paced development of virus vaccine candidates while maintaining safety and efficacy highlights the need for an advanced analytical toolkit, including mass spectrometry, for product and process characterization. Here, we show how charge detection mass spectrometry (CDMS) was utilized to characterize highly heterogeneous intact spike glycoprotein trimers as well as various intact mRNA constructs. The observed masses are in good agreement with orthogonal methods such as size-exclusion chromatography coupled to multi-angle light scattering (SEC-MALS) and field flow fractionation (FFF), demonstrating the possibility of using this new-to-industry method to obtain molecular mass information of highly heterogeneous reagents used in vaccine development. The established CDMS methods can be leveraged for future vaccine development.

Speaker: Dave Foreman, Merck


Fully Integrated Automation for Protein Characterization and Biologics Development

Hyatt Regency Minneapolis - Nicollet D
10:25 - 10:45 a.m. [CDT]

For protein biotherapeutics, the generation of a manufacturing cell line to support product development is a critical step. This involves screening hundreds of cell-lines per program by high-resolution analytical mass-spectrometry to ensure desired product quality. However typically mass-spectrometry is a time-consuming and complex technique involving sample preparation, data analysis and interpretation. We have developed an end-to-end analytical pipeline using robotic automation to integrate laboratory equipment enabling purification, enzymatic processing and data acquisition. Six analytical instruments, and 19 peripheral devices are centrally controlled through automation. Samples for intact, subunit and peptide mapping are acquired on Thermo Exploris 480 systems and the data is funneled into custom enterprise software for analysis and report generation. The system represents a lab-of-the-future concept eliminating the need for manual sample preparation and instrument operation, thereby improving consistency, bandwidth, and accelerating early molecule development.

Speaker: Hirsh Nanda, Director, Cell Engineering & Early Development, Janssen R&D


Characterization Strategies for AAV Gene Therapies

Hyatt Regency Minneapolis - Nicollet D
10:50 - 11:10 a.m. [CDT]

Gene therapies based on viral and non-viral vectors have come to the fore based on the transformational clinical potential offered by these medicines. Adeno associated viral vectors (AAV) used for viral based delivery represent a considerable manufacturing and characterisation challenge based on their molecular size, complexity, and general availability in limited quantities. Here, we will present strategies for, and practical examples of, the characterisation of AAV gene therapies comprising MS and LC-MS based approaches on different levels for product and process related contaminant analysis. We will present native MS analysis of intact capsids for fill state determination, LC-MS analysis of capsid proteins, peptide mapping workflows for capsid protein sequence confirmation and posttranslational modification analysis and determination of residual host cell proteins. Application to upstream development and downstream processing of AAV will be discussed.

Speaker: Jonathan Bones, Principal Investigator, NIBRT Characterisation and Comparability Lab


Multiple Dissociations and MSn Capabilities with AcquireX Workflow of Orbitrap IQ-X Tribrid MS for Small Molecule Structure Characterization

Hyatt Regency Minneapolis - Nicollet D
11:15 - 11:35 a.m.[CDT]

Impurity profiling and structure characterization by LCMS is an integral part of drug R&D to ensure drug efficacy and patient safety. High resolution mass spectrometry with multiple dissociations and high level MS/MS (MSn) capabilities provided crucial fragmentation fingerprint information for API and drug product impurity profiling and structure characterization.

In this study, Adefovir and AMG-510 impurity profiling was conducted using an LCMS system consisting of a Thermo Scientific Vanquish UHPLC and an Orbitrap IQ-X Tribrid mass spectrometer. HCD, UVPD, and CID dissociation techniques with MSn fragmentation were utilized to obtain in-depth structure information. AcquireX, a real-time decision-making data acquisition workflow, was also used to optimize MSn quality. The information-rich MSn data were processed and impurity structures proposed using “Compound Discoverer” software.

Speaker: Sarah J. Robinson, Genentech

Harnessing metabolomics as platform for rapid diagnostics

Hyatt Regency Minneapolis - Lakeshore B-C
10:00 - 10:20 a.m. [CDT]

Clinical microbiology testing plays a pivotal role in the management of infectious diseases. Despite this, identifying microbes (ID) and measure their antibiotic susceptibility profiles (AST) using traditional methods can take 2-5 days. This is a serious problem in the context of blood stream infections, where a single day of delay in prescribing the correct antibiotic can increase mortality rates by 5%. Over the last 5 years, the Lewis research group has worked to develop a new liquid chromatography mass spectrometry approach that could replace the traditional clinical microbiology pipeline. We will describe how this metabolomics-based platform can be leveraged to complete ID and AST testing in less than 4 hours and discuss the first clinical trials of this technology in Alberta hospitals.

Speaker: Ian Lewis, Assistant Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Calgary


Rapid Metabolic Profiling of Clinical Samples to Guide Treatment Decisions for Patients with the MasSpec Pen Technology

Hyatt Regency Minneapolis - Lakeshore B-C
10:25 - 10:45 a.m. [CDT]

Technologies that enable intraoperative tissue analysis and diagnosis are critically needed to guide surgical procedures and improve patient outcomes. Here we demonstrate the MasSpec Pen technology as a handheld device, integrated to a mass spectrometer, for rapid and direct molecular analysis of biological samples. Coupled with statistical modeling, we show that this rapid (<15s), non-destructive technology enables tissue classification and cancer diagnosis with high accuracy. Today’s presentation will describe recent developments and results translating MasSpec Pen technology integrated with an Orbitrap mass spectrometer to the clinic and operating rooms for in vivo tissue analysis and diagnosis. Technical developments and diagnostic performance in cancer surgery will also be discussed, as well as new opportunities and applications in the clinical setting.

Speaker: Livia Eberlin, Baylor College of Medicine


Development of a multiplexed assay of sphingolipids for clinical practice

Hyatt Regency Minneapolis - Lakeshore B-C
10:50 - 11:10 a.m. [CDT]

Lipids are ubiquitous in human biology and play roles in many cellular and intercellular processes. Inborn errors of lipid metabolism involve disturbances in the levels of lipids, namely mutational defects of enzymes involved in a metabolic pathway. A growing number of nervous system disorders report disturbances in the sphingolipid pathway including Farber disease, which is caused by deficiency of acid ceramidase (ASAH1) by the enzyme defect of dihydroceramide desaturase (DEGS1).

Although several mass spectrometric assays measuring sphingolipids for several lysosomal disorders are currently offered by our clinical laboratory, an assay that can analyze additional sphingolipids such as ceramides and deoxyceramides is needed. Multiplexing targets in a single assay that can screen multiple conditions or disorders can help the patients and physicians by saving time and cost. Mutations in enzymes from the de novo pathway of sphingolipids lead to various genetic disorders and a multiplexed assay that can quantify the plasma and serum lipids involved in the de novo pathway of sphingolipids (3-keto-sphinganine, sphinganine, sphingosine, dihydroceramides and ceramides) has been developed using the Thermo Scientific Vanquish Duo UHPLC coupled to a Thermo Scientific TSQ Altis mass spectrometer in this study. In addition, deoxysphingolipids synthesized from the condensation of palmitoyl-CoA and alanine have been reported to be implicated in various disorders including hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1. This assay also targets deoxy-ceramides, deoxy-dihydroceramides, deoxy-sphingosine and deoxy-sphinganine; with the measurements of all analytes from the synthesis pathway for ceramides/1-deoxy-ceramides, patients with relevant enzyme defects can be identified.

Speaker: Seul Kee Byeon, Ph.D, Mayo Clinic


Addressing the Challenges Confronting Breath Biopsy for Clinical Early Detection & Precision Medicine

Hyatt Regency Minneapolis - Lakeshore B-C
11:15 - 11:35 a.m. [CDT]

Breath is a rich matrix containing a vast selection of possible diagnostic biomarkers that could be accessed through non-invasive sampling. While the diagnostic potential of breath has been recognised since ancient times, few clinical breath tests have yet been approved for use. Key challenges in the field include the capability to reliably detect standardized breath samples, the analytical capacity to reproducibly detect potential biomarkers, and the biological insights to relate biomarkers on breath to key disease processes. GC-MS remains the gold standard for detecting and identifying biologically-relevant compounds on breath. Owlstone Medical have sought to maximize the potential to find and establish novel breath biomarkers by developing Breath Biopsy. Together with leading researchers in academia and industry, Owlstone have created devices and analytical solutions to support the development of breath-based clinical tests. This includes ReCIVA® Breath Sampler, a collection device that prioritizes standardization and reproducibility to generate robust data. This presentation will introduce the challenges of breath research, discuss how Breath Biopsy addresses these challenges and share some of the lessons learnt and expert insights gained through the process of developing Breath Biopsy OMNI, a complete end-to-end solution for analysis of volatile organic compounds on breath.

Speaker: Shane Swann, Owlstone Medical Limited

Enhanced PFAS detection in fish from AFFF-impacted surface waters on an Orbitrap Exploris 240 Mass Spectrometer

Hyatt Regency Minneapolis - Lakeshore A
10:00 - 10:20 a.m. [CDT]

The use of aqueous film-forming foam (AFFF) containing per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) has led to extensive environmental contamination. To evaluate the potential accumulation of a wide-suite of AFFF-derived PFASs in fish, fish tissues were collected from recreational ponds with elevated PFASs near AFFF-impacted sites. Tissues were homogenized, extracted, and analyzed by liquid chromatography high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). Target PFASS were quantified, and suspect screening was performed using the NIST PFAS Suspect List and MS2 libraries. Both legacy PFASs and a number of recently identified suspect PFASs were detected. Though PFOS remains one of the most abundant PFASs AFFF-impacted fish tissues, it also highlights the utility of HRMS suspect lists and libraries for monitoring for novel PFASs in biota.

Speaker: Professor Christopher P. Higgins, Colorado School of Mines


Confident analysis of volatile organic compounds in accordance with EPA regulations

Hyatt Regency Minneapolis - Lakeshore A
10:25 - 10:45 a.m. [CDT]

Volatile Organic Compounds or VOCs are produced by various industrial activities and prevalent in the environment. These compounds have an adverse effect on the environment and human health if exposure occurs. In order to protect the public, there are number of regulations in place to monitor the presence of VOCs in the environment. Purge and Trap (P&T) coupled with GC-MS is the analytical instrumentation of choice for laboratories monitoring VOCs in water and soil. The methods must meet the regulatory demands and analytical testing laboratories must be able to produce consistent results with sustained sample throughput. In this presentation our experts will guide you through a review of current regulatory requirements for P&T analysis in accordance with current regulations with specific examples including US EPA 524.2 and 8260. Teledyne Tekmar P&T experts will give an overview of the advantages of the P&T system combined with the new Thermo Scientific ISQ 7610 GC-MS system with in-depth data examples. The common challenges that can impact P&T workflows for EPA methods will be covered and practical examples of how these challenges can be overcome will be discussed.

Speaker: Amy Nutter , Teledyne Tekmar


Advances in LC-HRMS as a Powerful Tool for Food Quality Control

Hyatt Regency Minneapolis - Lakeshore A
10:50 - 11:10 a.m. [CDT]

The new LC 240 Exploris Orbitrap offer new capabilities to focus on food quality. We consider here the improved capability in pesticide residue control as a consequence of the increased scan speed that allows acquisition modes of Full scan, data dependent, all ion fragmentation and product ion scan simultaneously. With this a notable increase in the sensitivity is achieved keeping other facilities such as; detection of compounds out of the regular scope and analysis a posteriori. We have explored similarly the fast detection of food contact materials from plastic covers commonly present in precooked or ready-to-eat food.

Speaker: Amadeo R. Fernández-Alba, European Union Reference Laboratory for Pesticide Residues in Fruit & Vegetables- University of Almería


Environmental exposomics using wristbands and GC Orbitrap MS

Hyatt Regency Minneapolis - Lakeshore A
11:15 - 11:35 a.m. [CDT]

Using wearable passive sampler to absorb chemicals, and then measuring chemicals in the lab using high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS), is an emerging technology for comprehensively characterizing the airborne exposome. We apply our in-house passive sampling technology (FreshAir) and show the ability to detect a wide range of chemicals from PFAS to pesticides, showing seasonal, geographical, and behavioral trends across the globe. For suspect screening, alongside NIST/WILEY libraries novel in-silico rule-based PFAS libraries were developed. A new set of criteria and filters were developed to communicate confidence in GC-HRMS following the Schymanski et al. approach. Using this approach, we were able to confidently assign thousands of chemicals people are exposed to across the world, and determine those of most concern (spoiler alert: indoor application of biocides and pesticides by participants). We validated our new set of criteria and filters using spiked standards in human serum, and in our FreshAir passive sampling approach, and found in both cases when specific filters are used that a 10% false positive rate in suspect screening annotations can be achieved.

Speaker: Dr. Elizabeth Lin, Yale School of Public Health

Customer Hospitality Event

Hyatt Regency Minneapolis - Lakeshore A

1110 Nicollet Mall
Minneapolis, MN 55403

After attending our Users’ Meeting on Sunday, we hope you’ll join us for our Customer Hospitality Event at Brit’s Pub & Eating Establishment – right down the street! We’ll have the entire space to ourselves; both indoor and outdoor. Come join us to unwind and network while enjoying some great food and drinks. We’ll also have lawn bowling and some rounds of quizzes in the pub.

*Attendance to our Hospitality event requires proof of attendance to our Users’ meeting. Please bring your preregistration badge with you.

Breakfast workshops

Please see the lists below for which Breakfast workshop you are interested in registering for.


New Developments in Mass spectrometry based Single-Cell Proteomics

Thermo Fisher Hospitality Suite - Grand Ballroom E-F
7:00 - 8:00 a.m. [CDT]

The analysis of single cell proteomes has recently become a viable complement to transcriptomics and genomics studies. Proteins are the main driver of cellular functionality and mRNA levels are often an unreliable proxy of such. Therefore, the global analysis of the proteome is essential to study cellular identities. Both multiplexed and label-free mass spectrometry-based approaches with single cell resolution have lately attributed surprising heterogeneity to believed homogenous cell populations. Even though specialized experimental designs and instrumentation have demonstrated remarkable advances, the efficient sample preparation of single cells still lacks behind. Here, we introduce the proteoCHIP, an universal option for single cell proteomics sample preparation at surprising sensitivity and throughput. The automated processing using a commercial system combining single cell isolation and picoliter dispensing, the cellenONE®, allows to reduce final sample volumes to low nanoliters submerged in a hexadecane layer simultaneously eliminating error prone manual sample handling and overcoming evaporation. The specialized proteoCHIP design allows for the direct injection of single cells via a standard autosampler resulting in around 1,500 protein groups per analytical run at remarkable reporter ion signal to noise while reducing or eliminating the carrier proteome. We identified close to 2,600 proteins across 170 multiplexed single cells from two highly similar human cell types. This dedicated loss-less workflow allows to distinguish in vitro co-differentiated cell types of self-organizing cardiac organoids based on indicative markers across 150 single cells. In-depth characterization revealed enhanced cellular motility of endothelial cells and acute myocardium sarcomere organization in cardiomyocytes. Our versatile, and automated sample preparation has not only proven to be easily adoptable but is also sufficiently sensitive to drive biological applications of single cell proteomics.

Speaker: Karl Mechtler, Vienna BioCenter - Core Facilities


Comprehensive LC-MS characterization of synthetic single guide RNAs in CRISPR: from bottom-up to top-down

Thermo Fisher Hospitality Suite - Grand Ballroom G
7:00 - 8:00 a.m. [CDT]

In recent years, CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing has become an important tool in biomedical research and has demonstrated tremendous therapeutic potential. Single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) are one of the critical reagents to allow for sequence specific cutting in CRISPR. Therefore, the design and quality of the sgRNAs can greatly affect the efficiency and the specificity of genome editing. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is a powerful tool to detect molecular features from oligonucleotide samples. However, as the size of the oligonucleotides gets larger, many challenges arise. Here we showcase a suite of LC-MS methods ranging from bottom-up digestion to top-down approaches to sequence and characterize 100-nucleotide long synthetic guide RNAs.

Speakers: Bifan Chen, Senior Scientist, Small Molecule Analytical Chemistry, Genentech Research & Early Development, Genentech

High-resolution MS Imaging meets Orbitrap technology

Thermo Fisher Hospitality Suite - Grand Ballroom G
7:00 - 8:00 a.m. [CDT]

Atmospheric-pressure scanning microprobe MALDI mass spectrometry imaging (APSMALDI MSI) on orbital trapping mass spectrometers with SRIG or ion funnel inlets allows to disclose distinct morphologic distributions of lipids, peptides, drugs and metabolites in complex biological samples (tissues, cells, sub-cellular structures) with highest sensitivity, accuracy and resolution under ambient conditions. [1] We
developed various AP-SMALDI Orbitrap systems for high-performance imaging of planar and non-planar (three-dimensional) surfaces. Coaxial, orthogonal imaging was employed for highest lateral resolution on Orbitrap Exploris 120, 240 and 480 instruments. The systems provide pixelwise autofocusing operation, high-speed analysis and surface-topography imaging by three-dimensional scanning with 5 μm
laser spots. [2, 3].

Our AP-SMALDI Orbitrap MSI technology has been applied to a broad range of divers applicational fields such as veterinary medicine, plant sciences, cell biology, cancer research, neuroscience, parasite-host interactions, bacterial biofilms, drug discovery and others (see publication list on www.smaldi.de).

[1] B. Spengler B, Anal Chem 2015, 87, 64−82.
[2] M. Kompauer et al., Nature Methods 2017, 14, 90-96.
[3] M. Kompauer et al., Nature Methods 2017, 14, 1156-1158.

Speaker: Professor Dr. Bernhard Spengler, Justus Liebig University, and Director of the TransMIT Center


A New Experience in Automated Proteomics Sample Preparation

Thermo Fisher Hospitality Suite - Grand Ballroom E-F
7:00 - 8:00 a.m. [CDT]

Break free from the time, cost and complexity of manual sample preparation. This workshop will discuss the challenges of automated proteomics sample preparation and what's needed to overcome these so that scientists can achieve high quality experimental results,and focus their time on more valuable tasks. Attributes such as ease-of-use, experimental design, flexible workflows, and integration into existing proteomics infrastructure will be discussed with the scientific community.

Speakers: Daniel Lopez Ferrer, PhD, Dir. Proteomics and Translational Research, Thermo Fisher Scientific;
Maowei Dou, PhD, Scientist III, Protein Biology, Thermo Fisher Scientific

Orbitrap Analyzers: Turning an M/Z-Spectrometer into a MASS-Spectrometer

Thermo Fisher Hospitality Suite - Grand Ballroom G
7:00 - 8:00 a.m. [CDT]

A close 5-year collaboration between the Kelleher group at Northwestern University and Thermo Fisher Scientific has fostered an important investigation about the use of individual ions for direct mass spectrometry analysis. It has been determined that detecting individual ion signals, rather than traditional packets of ions, advances Orbitrap-based resolution and charge detection capabilities. To this end, individual ion mass spectrometry alters spectral outputs directly into the Dalton domain to deconvolute complex protein mixtures and determine mass distributions for large virus-like particles ranging from 8 kDa to 6 MDa. Direct Mass Technologies coupled with easy to handle analysis software advances charge detection capabilities to the scientific community at large.

Speaker:
Jared O. Kafader, Northwestern University Project


How to Get Started in Single Cell Proteomics - A Practical Guide

Thermo Fisher Hospitality Suite - Grand Ballroom E-F
7:00 - 8:00 a.m. [CDT]

The high throughput multiplexed single cell (Sc) proteomics workflow includes several crucial steps: (1) single-cell sorting and isolation (2) sample preparation and TMT labelling 3) optimized TMT sample analysis with LC-MS and 4) data visualization and interpretation. There are experimental considerations and critical steps throughout the workflow that can impact results and determine the success of a study. This workshop will provide you with practical insights that will deliver a well-planned and executed experiment that enables accurate data and insightful conclusions.

Speakers: Anjali Seth, PhD, Head of Single Cell Proteomics, Cellenion, France; Ryan Kelly, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, USA

Increasing sample throughput in ultra-trace environmental analysis with GC-MS/MS

Convention Center, 200-HI
7:00 - 8:00 a.m. [CDT]

Ultra-trace analysis of environmental contaminants including dioxins, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated biphenyls (PBDEs) is key to public safety. These persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are toxic to wildlife and humans and must be monitored in the environment to limit exposure.  GC-MS/MS technology has been widely adopted for the analysis of POPs, due to its flexibility and robustness. GC-MS/MS is able to reach the regulatory limits complex matrices due to the selectivity, sensitivity and accuracy of the technique. These attributes allow the user to have an increased instrument uptime due to the limited maintenance needed on the system, even when analyzing complex food and environmental samples. This is extremely important to a commercial laboratory since time is money. In this presentation Pacific Rim Laboratories will discuss the work the laboratory has performed in collaboration with Thermo Fisher Scientific to evaluate the new Thermo Scientific TSQ 9610 Triple Quadrupole GC-MS/MS System. The presentation will cover how Pacific Rim Laboratories was able to increase instrument uptime and improve sample throughput. Discussion will include the analysis of various POPs including low level Dioxins and PCBs, PBDEs and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs). The method consolidation of PBDE, OCP and marker PCBs in a single run for the analysis of fish oil will be demonstrated. Finally, analysis of emerging compounds of interest in the environment including Chlorophenolics will also be presented.

Speaker: Kjell Hope, Pacific Rim Laboratories


Advances in LC-HRMS Metabolomics and Lipidomics for disease diagnostics

Convention Center, 200-J
7:00 - 8:00 a.m. [CDT]

Metabolomics refers to the comprehensive measurement of small molecules in biofluids by mass spectrometry to provide new insights into disease etiologies. Lipidomics is a subset of metabolomics focused specifically on the analysis of lipid species. MS based ‘Omics couples the use of LC to separate metabolites based on polarity and high-resolution MS to accurately measure the m/z. These ‘Omics also represent the merging of many disciplines. It covers knowledge of metabolism, analytical measurement and statistical analysis as well as integrated pathway mapping in order to unravel cellular complexities.  Work in disease diagnostics merges analytical capabilities with informatics to develop better diagnostics. This talk will discuss metabolomics in the context of meningioma and Fabry.

Speaker: Timothy J Garrett, PhD, Associate Professor, Departments of Pathology and Chemistry, University of Florida

Posters


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Videos


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New products presented at ASMS


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