Cigarette and e-Cigarette Testing Information

Reliable technologies to help you meet regulatory guidelines

Cigarettes and e-cigarettes both contain harmful chemicals, additives and toxins that may cause serious health issues like cancer and lung disease. Cigarettes contains numerous constituents like nicotine, ammonia, metals, PAHs, nitrosamines, ethylene glycol, formaldehyde, pesticides and others. So, testing of these ingredients is critical for safety reasons.  Electronic cigarettes, or e-cigarettes were promoted as a safer alternative to smoking tobacco, however, new health concerns about e-cigarettes make it clear that these products need to be tested and regulated.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and other regulatory agencies around the world regulate cigarettes and other tobacco products to mitigate the hazardous effects they can have on human health. These regulations make identification and quantification of hazardous compounds in cigarettes and cigarette smoke critical to tobacco suppliers. Our instruments help in the testing of these ingredients.

On this page


Resources for e-cigarette testing

Thermal decomposition of vitamin E acetate in a surrogate vaping environment

Thermal decomposition of vitamin E acetate in a surrogate vaping environment

This application note demonstrates the utility of high-temperature headspace sampling for the evaluation of products, such as e-liquids or e-juice, intended for inhalation after high-temperature vaporization (vaping). The surrogate vaporization environment enables tightly controlled temperature and time domain experiments that remove the variability associated with sampling directly from vaporization products.

A simplified approach for nicotine quantification in electronic cigarette liquids using GC-Orbitrap mass spectrometry

A simplified approach for nicotine quantification in electronic cigarette liquids using GC-Orbitrap mass spectrometry

Current analytical technologies for analysis of e-liquids include liquid chromatography (LC) and gas chromatography (GC) coupled to analog detectors or mass spectrometers (MS). These methods may lack the sensitivity and selectivity required for accurate analysis. This technical note demonstrates a powerful solution for both qualitative and quantitative analysis of e-liquids, including quantitation of nicotine, using GC with high-resolution, accurate-mass MS.

Comprehensive chemical characterization of e-cigarette liquids using high-resolution Orbitrap GC-MS

Comprehensive chemical characterization of e-cigarette liquids using high-resolution Orbitrap GC-MS

Both LC-MS and GC-MS have limitations with regards to mass accuracy, sensitivity and linear dynamic range when analyzing e-cigarette liquids (e-liquids). This study demonstrates confident characterization of both targeted and non-targeted compounds in e-liquids using high-resolution accurate-mass GC-MS technology.

Delivering client success through unique and preemptive service – A global analytical GMP business perspective

Delivering client success through unique and preemptive service – A global analytical GMP business perspective

With a diverse array of e-liquids (various flavors and base constituents) comes some substantial analytical challenges. Learn how analysts at Broughton Laboratories integrated LC-MS/MS into their testing workflow to more confidently detect, verify and quantify more target compound peaks than was possible before.

Blog post: E-cigarettes – Are they really safe?

Blog post: E-cigarettes – Are they really safe?

Are e-cigarettes really less harmful than conventional cigarettes? This blog post looks at e-cigarettes, e-liquids, and vapor and what kinds of chemicals are in them. Although e-cigarettes contain fewer toxins than combustible cigarettes, the short- and long-term effects are still unclear.

Related products for e-cigarette testing

Learn more about the Thermo Scientific instruments mentioned in the documents above and how they can help analyze the chemicals related to vaping and e-cigarettes.

On demand webinars

Use of LC-MS/MS for testing of nicotine in e-cigarette vapors

Natalie Thompson, Lead Principal Scientist at Broughton Nicotine Services presents the development and validation of a fast, routine analytical test method for the quantification of nicotine in ENDS vapors. Vapor and/or smoke from electronic cigarettes, tobacco heated products (THPs) and combustible cigarettes was trapped in DMSO, extracted and analyzed using isotope dilution LC-MS/MS.

Register to view

Orbitrap GC-MS – Unknowns discovery workflows for the characterization of e-cigarette liquids

In this webinar, we discuss how a high-resolution accurate mass (HRAM) approach can be used to overcome some of the limitations of triple quadrupole GC-MS and GC-FID to achieve confident targeted and non-targeted compound identifications in e-liquids.

Register to view


Resources for cigarette testing

Determination of ammonia in tobacco smoke

Determination of ammonia in tobacco smoke

This study describes an ion chromatography-based method for the accurate determination of ammonium in tobacco smoke. The method achieves better resolution of ammonium from other analytes present in tobacco smoke when compared to other ion chromatography (IC) methods.

Superior separation of nicotine and tobacco related alkaloids by utilizing the selectivity of hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC)

Superior separation of nicotine and tobacco related alkaloids by utilizing the selectivity of hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC)

Nicotine and its metabolites are highly polar compounds, which may result in poor chromatographic resolution when using reverse phase liquid chromatography (LC) columns. The resolution is poor enough for some isobaric compounds that it is insufficient for LC-MS analysis. This problem can be addressed using hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC), as discussed in this technical note.

Related products for cigarette testing

Learn more about the products mentioned in the documents above and how they can help analyze cigarette-related chemicals.