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Stay curious

The latest issue of Life in the Lab shines a light on the innate curiosity of fellow scientists and how they continue to seek innovation and increase productivity and knowledge in their research.

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Facing the challenges of science

Scientific progress is marked by both breakthroughs and failures. We asked fellow scientists how they learn from their setbacks, connect abstract ideas, and persevere through this long, noble, and very human journey. What we heard was amazing.

“Science is not a sprint, it’s a marathon.”

“I really put a lot of effort every single day in making sure that I am filling myself up; because if I don’t, I can’t be creative in the lab, I can’t perform. When you want to be innovative, you have to fail; you have to know where that edge is. When you are hitting a wall, just step back, take a walk, get air: it opens up a creative space for other things to happen. What keeps me going day in and day out is hope.” —Christina Waters

“The challenge with science is that the goal is always changing.”

A bad day is: nothing works. A good day is: you finally got it to work. So whenever I hit a wall, the first thing I always go to is music. I fell asleep with a big old smile on my face and just went in the lab the next day just feeling like, ready to roll, recharged, ready to go. Maybe I’ll find some great cure, or maybe I’ll move the science just a little bit forward. That really gets me out of bed every day, knowing that I am part of that fight.” —Justin Slawson

“Progress comes from failure by pushing through.”

“I was strictly analytical and scientific; and as I got more sophisticated in doing research, I wanted to be more creative. When I get stuck in my lab I kind of go to these places that draw me to a creative space. Progress comes from failure by pushing through. You need to overcome the fear of failure because you fail all the time when you are learning. The best scientists I know, the ones that make those incredible breakthroughs, are incredibly creative.” —Sarah Dykstra

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