Thermo Scientific™

IMAGEN™ Respiratory Virus Screen Kit using Direct Immunofluorescence Assay

Catalog number: K612011-2
Thermo Scientific™

IMAGEN™ Respiratory Virus Screen Kit using Direct Immunofluorescence Assay

Catalog number: K612011-2

Presumptively detect respiratory syncytical virus (RSV), influenza A and B virus, parainfluenza virus 1,2 & 3 and adenovirus in respiratory specimens with Thermo Scientific™ IMAGEN™ Respiratory Virus Screen Kit. The assay cannot differentiate between the viruses. Individual viruses should be further identified and confirmed using monospecific FITC labeled monoclonal antibody reagents, such as the IMAGEN range, or other methods. The direct respiratory specimen results must be confirmed by cell culture.

 
Catalog Number
K612011-2
Unit Size
Each
Quantity
100 Tests
Price (USD)
Full specifications
DescriptionIMAGEN™ Respiratory Screen
Detectable AnalytesRespiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV)
Sample TypeNasopharyngeal
TypeReagent
Quantity100 Tests
Unit SizeEach
Showing 1 of 1
Catalog NumberSpecificationsUnit SizeQuantityPrice (USD)
K612011-2Full specifications
Each100 TestsRequest A Quote
DescriptionIMAGEN™ Respiratory Screen
Detectable AnalytesRespiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV)
Sample TypeNasopharyngeal
TypeReagent
Quantity100 Tests
Unit SizeEach
Showing 1 of 1

Respiratory virus infections are associated with major outbreaks of respiratory disease throughout the world which have a significant impact on world health1,2,3. Viruses cause disease in all age groups but infections are most severe in infant, elderly and immunocompromised populations leading to hospitalization of patients4. Rapid diagnosis of respiratory virus infections is an important aid in the management of patients, prevention, and control of outbreaks, and in influencing the use of antiviral therapy, particularly for influenza A and RSV viral infections.3

Use IMAGEN Respiratory Virus Screen Kit as a rapid, sensitive, and specific method for the presumptive detection of respiratory syncytical virus (RSV), influenza A and B virus, parainfluenza virus 1,2 & 3 and adenovirus in respiratory specimens.

  • Rapid results—within a little over 30 minutes of receiving test sample or culture
  • Simple—ready-to-use reagents plus all IMAGEN assays follow the same basic methodology
  • Excellent sensitivity and specificity—high quality, well-characterized antibodies used in the assay provide excellent sensitivity and specificity
  • Easy-to-read results
  • Long shelf life—24 months

The viruses mainly responsible for lower respiratory tract infection include RSV, influenza A and B viruses, parainfluenza virus 1, 2 and 3 and adenoviruses. Expected prevalence rates for individual viruses are detailed (with references) in Section 13, Expected Values.

RSV and parainfluenza viruses occur seasonally and are major causes of lower respiratory tract disease in infants and young children. They frequently cause bronchiolitis, croup, bronchitis, and occasionally pneumonia5,6,7. Influenza A and B viruses cause worldwide seasonal epidemics of respiratory disease in adults and infants with a disease spectrum ranging from mild upper respiratory tract symptoms to severe pneumonia8,9. Acute pneumonia in elderly or immunocompromised patients can be life-threatening, particularly when associated with secondary microbial infections.

Adenovirus infections are associated with respiratory, ocular, and enteric disease10. Adenoviruses are reported to be responsible for 5% of acute respiratory diseases in children under the age of 4 years and are a common cause of pharyngitis in young children11.

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1. Palumbo P.E. and Douglas Jr R.G. (1986) Respiratory Tract Infections in S. Spector and G.J. Lancz (ed). Clinical Virology Manual. Elsevier Science Publishing Inc, New York, p 263-282.
2. Ray C.G. and Minnich L.L. (1987) Efficiency of immunofluorescence for rapid detection of common respiratory viruses. J. Clin. Microbiol. 25: 355-357.
3. Stansfield S.K. (1987) Acute respiratory infections in the developing world: strategies for preventing treatment and control. Pediatric Infectious Disease 6: 622-629.
4. Gardner P.S., Turk D.C., Aherne W.A., Bird T., Holdaway M.D., Court S.D.M. (1967) Deaths associated with respiratory tract infection in childhood. British Medical Journal 4: 316-320.
5.Zaroukian M.H., Leader I. (1988) Community-acquired pneumonia and infection with respiratory syncytial virus. American Journal Medical Science 295: 218-222.
6. Welliver R. (1982) Natural history of parainfluenza virus infection in childhood. Journal of Pediatrics 101: 180-187.
7. Martin A.J., Gardner P.S., and McQuillin J. (1978) Epidemiology of respiratory viral infection among paediatric inpatients over a six year period in North East England. The Lancet ii: 1035-1038.
8.Potter C.W. (1990) Influenza. In Principles and Practice for Clinical Virology (eds A.J. Zuckerman et al). John Wiley and Sons Ltd, Chichester, pp 213-238.
9. Murphy B.R. and Webster R.G. (1990) Orthomyxoviruses in Virology (eds B.N. Fields and D.M. Kripe) Raven Press, New York, pp 1091-11523.
10.Wadell G. (1990) Adenoviruses. In Principles and Practice of Clinical Virology (eds A.J. Zuckerman et al). John Wiley and Sons Ltd. Chapter 4 iv, pp 267-287.
11. Horwitz M.S. (1985) Adenoviral diseases: In Virology (eds B.N. Fields et al). Raven Press, New York, Chapter 24, pp 477-495.

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