ImmunoCAP Tryptase Test Unique Marker of Severe Reactions/Mastocytosis

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ImmunoCAP™ Tryptase is a unique marker that measures the total level of tryptase released by mast cells into circulation. Elevated tryptase levels help clinicians confirm mast cell activation during a severe allergic reaction, to decide if venom immunotherapy (VIT) is appropriate and to support the diagnosis of mastocytosis.1-3 ImmunoCAP Tryptase enables the measurement of transient increases in the level of tryptase as well as the establishment of the person’s baseline tryptase level. A transient increase of tryptase during a severe reaction helps to identify and assess the extent of the reaction.1 A persistent elevated baseline level of tryptase is an indication of possible mastocytosis.1,3

ImmunoCAP Tryptase testing in addition to clinical findings can help healthcare providers make:

Accurate diagnosis
  • Severe reaction: Tryptase testing and relevant, specific IgE antibody testing, help identify if the underlying cause of the severe reaction is an allergy.4,5
  • Mastocytosis: Tryptase baseline levels reflect the mast cell burden in the body and can help to rule in or rule out systemic mastocytosis.1,3
Assessment of risk
  • An elevated baseline tryptase level may be a significant risk factor for repeated severe reactions to Hymenoptera insect stings and drugs, in conjunction with other clinical findings.2,4,5
Relevant treatment decisions
  • Help decide if VIT is appropriate for patients with previous reactions to bee and/or wasp stings.2,4,5
  • Decide on lifelong treatment for venom allergic patients with underlying mastocytosis.2,4,5
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References
  1. Schwartz, L.B., Diagnostic value of tryptase in anaphylaxis and mastocytosis. Immunol Allergy Clin North Am, 2006. 26(3): p. 451-63.
  2. Bonifazi, F., et al., Prevention and treatment of hymenoptera venom allergy: guidelines for clinical practice. Allergy, 2005. 60(12): p. 1459-70.
  3. Horny H-P et al. Mastocytosis. In: Swerdlow SH, Campo E, Harris NL, Jaffe ES, Pileri SA, Stein H, Thiele J (Eds). WHO Classification of Tumours of Haematopoietic and Lymphoid Tissues (Revised 4th edition). IARC: Lyon, 2017. .
  4. Simons, F.E., et al., International consensus on (ICON) anaphylaxis. World Allergy Organ J, 2014. 7(1): p. 9.
  5. Simons, F.E., et al., 2015 update of the evidence base: World Allergy Organization anaphylaxis guidelines. World Allergy Organ J, 2015. 8(1): p. 32.